Peter and Paul Cathedral

Minsk, Belarus

SS Peter and Paul Church is one of the oldest stone buildings in Minsk, constructed on a narrow street Rakauskaja and remained up till now as a monument of architecture of the 17th century. The building was started in 1611 and was finished after two years. During wars and religious conflicts the church served as a fortress. It explains the thickness of its walls, a high arrangement of windows above the ground and presence of loopholes. In 1795 in the church there was Minsk Cathedral named after Russian empress Ekaterina, who gave money for reorganization. In the middle of the 19th century during the restoration the temple got some features of pseudo-Russian style. From 1991 services in church are renewed. The church is a monument of an early Baroque with elements of the Renaissance style.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Vulitsa Nyamiha, Minsk, Belarus
See all sites in Minsk

Details

Founded: 1611-1613
Category: Religious sites in Belarus

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alla Paragas (7 months ago)
Из всех православных соборов ( церквей) Минска, где бывала, душа к этому легла. Всегда после его посещения на душе спокойно становится. Но всё-таки просьба есть к служителям храма: не разрешайте обслуживающим бабушкам тушить и забирать свечи, которые едва половину прогорели. Как-то не по себе становится, когда поставишь свечу за здравие, а ее намеренно потушили и убрали, хотя могла ещё гореть и гореть!
Андрей Шарандо (8 months ago)
Старейший православный храм в Минске. Был построен ещё в 17 веке, когда православие было запрещено в Польше. Сейчас является одним из самых красивых зданий в городе. К сожалению, в советские годы, утрачены часть фресок, но и то, что сохранилось, поражает красотой.
Надежда Костеневич (9 months ago)
Адзін з маіх улюбёных храмаў Беларусі. Раю наведаць)
alexey sidorov (11 months ago)
Good to pray
Максим Подлинный (13 months ago)
Найстарэйшая царква Мінска, з тых, што дайшла да нашых дзён. 1611г. пачатак будаўніцтва. Калісці знаходзіўся ў атачэнні старОй гарадской забудовы, пакуль саветы не "прарубілі" побач вуліцу Нямігу, а побач пабудавалі шматпавярхоўку...
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hochosterwitz Castle

Hochosterwitz Castle is considered to be one of Austria's most impressive medieval castles. The rock castle is one of the state's landmarks and a major tourist attraction.

The site was first mentioned in an 860 deed issued by King Louis the German of East Francia, donating several of his properties in the former Principality of Carantania to the Archdiocese of Salzburg. In the 11th century Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg ceded the castle to the Dukes of Carinthia from the noble House of Sponheim in return for their support during the Investiture Controversy. The Sponheim dukes bestowed the fiefdom upon the family of Osterwitz, who held the hereditary office of the cup-bearer in 1209.

In the 15th century, the last Carinthian cup-bearer, Georg of Osterwitz was captured in a Turkish invasion and died in 1476 in prison without leaving descendants. So after four centuries, on 30 May 1478, the possession of the castle reverted to Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg.

Over the next 30 years, the castle was badly damaged by numerous Turkish campaigns. On 5 October 1509, Emperor Maximilian I handed the castle as a pledge to Matthäus Lang von Wellenburg, then Bishop of Gurk. Bishop Lang undertook a substantial renovation project for the damaged castle.

About 1541, German king Ferdinand I of Habsburg bestowed Hochosterwitz upon the Carinthian governor Christof Khevenhüller. In 1571, Baron George Khevenhüller acquired the citadel by purchase. He fortified to deal with the threat of Turkish invasions of the region, building an armory and 14 gates between 1570 and 1586. Such massive fortification is considered unique in citadel construction.

Since the 16th century, no major changes have been made to Hochosterwitz. It has also remained in the possession of the Khevenhüller family as requested by the original builder, George Khevenhüller. A marble plaque dating from 1576 in the castle yard documents this request.

A specific feature is the access way to the castle passing through a total of 14 gates, which are particularly prominent owing to the castle's situation in the landscape. Tourists are allowed to walk the 620-metre long pathway through the gates up to the castle; each gate has a diagram of the defense mechanism used to seal that particular gate. The castle rooms hold a collection of prehistoric artifacts, paintings, weapons, and armor, including one set of armor 2.4 metres tall, once worn by Burghauptmann Schenk.