The Castle Amerongen was built in 1673 on the site of a previous stronghold that had been burned by the French troops during the invasion of 1672. The current building was designed by the architect Maurits Post as a baroque palace for the owners Godard Adriaan van Reede and his wife Margaretha Turnor. In the main hall a central staircase with painted ceiling was built by Willem van Nimwegen. Other ornaments were added in the early 20th century by P. J. H. Cuypers. The gardens contain historical elements and the walls predate 1673.

Near the entrance bridge dating from 1678 is a wooden clock tower from 1728 that contains the original clock of the same date. In the north-east corner of the gardens is an orangerie dating from the 1880s, and the north wall was raised during the period when Wilhelm II was residing there 1918-1920. He abdicated in Amerongen then moved to Huis Doorn.

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Founded: 1673
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jac. Scholtes (3 months ago)
A very nice castle. During the visit you will hear interesting stories from nice guides.
Sjoerd Baars (3 months ago)
We went on a Saturday with kids 3,5,10 and 13 years old. The kids had different puzzles to solve and every room had its own speaker with time to answer questions. Great experience!
Manami Roy (10 months ago)
Well preserved, well maintained, beautiful location and garden and to top it all a guided tour makes the entire experience an unforgettable one.
Jan-Thijs Koster (11 months ago)
Dutch history at it best, with stunning stories about the people that lived here, told by the guides (during COVID small groups only are allowed, and one guide per room). The castle gardens are also worth visiting.
Maureen Al (15 months ago)
It's beautiful. The volunteers make the castle come alive. They took a lot of corona measures.
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