The Sassenpoort is a gatehouse in the citywall of Zwolle, Netherlands. It was build in 1409 after Zwolle city became a member of the Hanseatic League in 1407. The city gates represent the wealth of this period. In the period between 1893 and 1898 restoration work took place. The dormers were made, and a neogothic spire clock tower was installed, replacing an earlier 18th century spire. In between the corner towers is a machicolation. From holes in the floor of this outer work, boiling oil could be thrown at enemies. The gatehouse is a rijksmonument since 1967 and is part of the Top 100 Dutch heritage sites. The gate now serves as a pedestrian road.

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Founded: 1409
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sander Smeenk (17 months ago)
Nice big old city defense tower in Zwolle. The volunteers are very nice and love to give historical background about the place. Up top are old prisoncells and the old clock!
3b Warwick (18 months ago)
Zwolle history at it's best.
Naga kumar (2 years ago)
Good place to visit! It's very close to the Zwolle Railway Station. It is present very close to the road. The usual traffic and pedestrians movement is present everytime at the Sassenport. Also, there are many company offices near the monument. There are doors which open on few days a year and the stairs lead to the top of the Sassenport. All the major monuments of Zwolle are situated in the shape of a star! So, exploring the major places in Zwolle is very convenient by walk and at last you will end up at the Zwolle Railway Station.
Peter M (2 years ago)
The beauty of this historic building is enhanced by the tour guides who gave extensive historic details about the history of Zwolle which was an important trading city since the 14th century. This is one of the many places that makes Zwolle such an interesting and fun place to visit without the crowds of other Dutch historic cities
Martin Rowe (2 years ago)
Stunning piece of early brick architecture. Guides were warm and welcoming, too.
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