Around 1300, Rosendael Castle came into the hands of the counts and later dukes of Gelre. Of the 20 castles in the dukedom, Rosendael was the favourite of many dukes, because of its beautiful location on the edge of the Veluwe moraine.

The large medieval complex contained a forecourt, a main fortress and a substantial donjon. Only the round donjon has survived the ravages of time. It has walls of up to 4 metres thick and was the last refuge in the event of siege for the duke and his family. Although it is the highest tower of its kind in the Netherlands, it was originally twice as high.

The ducal family resided regularly at the castle until the 16th century. But then the tide turned. In 1502, Philip the Handsome captured the city of Arnhem. Duke Charles of Gelre was humiliated in his own castle of Rosendael by Philip. Charles was forced to make peace and was exiled from Gelre. The incident became known as 'the prostration of Rosendael'.

When Philip died in 1506, Charles managed to regain the dukedom of Gelre at great financial expense. As a result, in 1516 he was forced to mortgage his beloved castle and even to sell it 20 years later. He died a few years afterwards and the dukedom soon lost its independence. Rosendael Castle came into the hands of various noble families, who occupied it for almost 400 years.

In 1722 a square house was built abutting the big tower. The side wing and coach house were built a century later. Beautiful gardens were laid out around these, and the famous French landscape gardener Daniel Marot designed the shell gallery, the trick fountains and the tea pavilion, all of which have been preserved. They give the austere medieval castle the character of a peaceful country house.

During the war, Rosendael was hit hard a number of times. It ceased to be a private residence in 1977 when Baron van Pallandt died. The castle was fully restored in the nineteen-eighties and opened to the public.

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Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reza Ahmed Khan (13 months ago)
Nice historic place to visit
ben maasbommel (14 months ago)
Nice parc with a number of water features and garden follies. Top attraction 'de bedriegertjes' got me wet again
andrej spaskov (14 months ago)
Amazing place
Steve Burt (2 years ago)
A chateau style building and grounds, near Arnhem. Picturesque gardens. Imposing orangery now a cafe of mediocre standard. Has more potential than being used at the moment. Toilet facillities for the site are in this building - at the top of the hill! Not very disabled friendly in general.
onsiri netisak (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful castle in The Netherlands and so amazing garden.
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