Waardenburg Castle dates from the 13th century. Only half of the original building remains: the south wing was destroyed in the Eighty Years’ War and was never rebuilt. Legend has it that the infamous Doctor Faust lived in the castle. At the end of his pact with the devil he was said to have been thrown from the castle tower.

The precise construction date of medieval castles is seldom known yet in this case, Waardenburg is an exception. On 2nd August 1265, Count Otto II of Guelders pledged the manor of Waardenburg to the knight Rudolph de Cock. Knight Rudolph first built a wooden tower, which was soon replaced by a stone tower. His son and grandson turned the keep into a round castle with three connecting wings, a circular wall, towers, fortified bailey and a moat.

According to a legend in the Geldersche Volksalmanak (Gelderland’s Folk almanac) dating from 1842, the infamous Doctor Faust lived in Waardenburg Castle. Faust had made a pact with the devil and in exchange for his soul, he could have all of the knowledge from all of the world for seven years. After seven years of abusing this power, the devil came to take his soul. He dragged Faust by his hair out of the castle tower and the indelible blood stains can still be seen on the pavement to this day.Johann Georg Faust did actually exist and he was imprisoned in Batenburg Castle for several years.

In the Eighty Years’ War the castle’s occupant, Catharina van Gelder, sided with the Spaniards, which did not please William of Orange. He besieged the castle in 1574 destroying the south side of the castle and the fortified bailey which were never rebuilt. This explains why the castle is now shaped like a horseshoe. The rest of the castle was renovated in the 17th century and was home to various noble families. The building has recently been thoroughly restored and now houses an office. Access to the castle is limited.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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User Reviews

Angelo Blasutta (3 years ago)
Nice castle, nice sorroundings. It hosts an Academy for lawyers.
Paul E. Reitsma (3 years ago)
Prachtig onverwacht kasteel in mooie natuur.
Jos Stöver (4 years ago)
Mooie wandeling rond het kasteel, dat zelf privébezit is en niet toegankelijk. Ik had het niet in de gaten en werd dan ook van het terrein gestuurd. Mocht overigens nog wel een paar plaatjes schieten.
Shelly D (4 years ago)
Beautiful area
Gerdo Nieuwenhuizen (6 years ago)
In private hands, not open for the public
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