Breda Béguinage

Breda, Netherlands

The Begijnhof (Béguinage) Museum in Breda is a walled complex that consists of houses and a small church and can be found in the center of Breda. 29 houses spreading over two courtyards are grouped around an herb garden and referred to as the Begijnhof. The Breda’s Begijnhof Museum provides insight into the world of Breda’s beguines. It includes a permanent exhibition of relics from the collection of Hamers IJsebrand and Harrie Hammers.

The first beguines were founded by Mr Hendrick van Breda, lord of shots and Breda, in 1267. That castle was moved to its current location in Catherine’s street in 1535 due to its expansion. In the 19th century, the court was expanded with a second courtyard and the St Catherine church.The beguines were since the 12th century a movement of pious Catholic women who wanted to live a life of contemplation, and prayer in chastity. The Beguines were mostly of noble descent. The first Beguinage foundation was laid bare in the 90’s of the 20th century and studied. The majority of houses were replaced in the 17th century. Breda’s Begijnhof Museum is the oldest of the two beguine found in the Netherlands.

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Founded: 1267
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christina M. (3 years ago)
Nice and quiet place.
AROUND THE WORLD (4 years ago)
Beautiful place..expected more from Breda...for night life and terrasses it is perfect
Sp00ky LeSp00k (4 years ago)
When I lived in Breda, I was in an abusive relationship and at rock bottom in all aspects of life. Going to this garden, walking through and attending a service at this little church, was one of the only bright points I remember from this time. A small moment of peace. Highly recommend
Laszlo Simon (4 years ago)
Nice and quiet place.
elena-simona biton (5 years ago)
The garden looked amazing. Definitely worth a visit
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