The Vermeer Center Delft brings back Johannes Vermeer to Delft. The center is located at the historical location of the Saint Lucas guild (painters guild) on the Voldersgracht. Johannes Vermeer is one of the best known artists from the Dutch Golden Age. His name is inextricably linked with Delft, the city in which he was born in 1632 and where he lived and worked all his life. His paintings found their way all over the world. The Vermeer Center Delft is housed on the historic site of the former St. Lucas Guild, where Vermeer was Dean of the painters for many years.

In the world of Vermeer, you experience 17th century Delft. Wandering through the famous ‘View of Delft’ and encounters with Vermeer's environment and the breeding ground for his talent: the blossoming academic and artistic climate in Delft, his customers, his family and his wealthy mother-in-law.

In Vermeer's world, life-size images of all his paintings have been brought together. An oeuvre of 36 paintings in which Vermeer created a whole new world.

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Category: Museums in Netherlands

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ben Meurs (14 months ago)
It is a shame that none of Vermeer’s artworks remain in Delft. Good to have a chronology of Vermeer’s oeuvre but really it is better to visit the Rijksmuseum and Mauritshuis where several of his works are housed. Friendly staff but not really worth the entry fee.
Jade E (14 months ago)
Loved the guided tour! Very interesting & informative not just about Vermeer but about Delft as well!
Healey Patrick (15 months ago)
If you love Vermeer this is a great museum. We could have spent a lot longer then we did. Somebody told us that 45 minutes to an hour was long enough. So we showed up too close to closing. It would have been wonderful to spend two hours there or three. Also their hours were like business hours not normal museum hours so they close fairly early in the evening or late in the afternoon.
Akemi Akito (2 years ago)
Not much to see, ticket is too expensive for just printed reproductions of his paintings. There's not one original painting in there or any of his things. Only the shop is worth it.
teresa eckerman-pfeil (2 years ago)
I loved visiting this place. It was a great way to learn more about the wonderful artist and his time. Seeing reproductions of all his known works displayed in chronological order amongst other exhibits that provided historical context was a great way to start our visit to Delft.
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