The City Hall in Delft is a Renaissance style former seat of the city's government, and still today the place where residents hold their civic wedding ceremonies. Originally designed by the Dutch architect Hendrick de Keyser, it was heavily changed over the centuries and was restored in the 20th century to its Renaissance appearance. The old city hall burned down n 1618, and since Hendrik de Keyser was working across the Markt at the Nieuwe Kerk, he was asked to design a new one.

There are some group portraits, and portraits of the counts of Orange and Nassau, including several by Michiel van Mierevelt (1567–1641), one of the earliest Dutch portrait painters, and with his son Pieter (1595–1623), a native of Delft. The oldest part of the complex is the tower covered in 'Gobertanger' limestone from Wallonia, a building material used often in important renaissance buildings in the Netherlands up to 1600. The tower, called 'De Steen', was originally built around 1300 and has decorative clockfaces from 1536 and the bells were made by Hendrick van Trier and Francois Hemony. The facade has a 'Justitia' statue. Under the tower is an old city prison where the assassin of Willem the Silent, Balthasar Gérard, was kept before sentencing.

Up the stairway and immediately behind the heavy wooden entrance doors is the Vierschaar, with a decorative painting of the Judgment of Solomon by Pieter van Bronckhorst.

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Address

Markt 87, Delft, Netherlands
See all sites in Delft

Details

Founded: 1618
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Widita Budhysutanto (2 years ago)
A very beautiful building from the outside and a very classy wedding hall from the inside.
Ko Glerum (2 years ago)
The old townhall of Delft is a very nice old building dating back several centuries and combining various building styles from different times.
Justin van Schaick (2 years ago)
Beautiful medieval building and one of the oldest in Delft. The building actually started out as just a tower (the top section still visible) and several sections were added and demolished over the following centuries as the function of the building changed. So some parts actually date back a lot further than others. The tower has a small prison and some medieval torture instruments that were used to make suspect "confess" to their crimes. Unfortunately this building is not open to the public unless you visit during the annual 'Open Monumenten Dag' (open house for monuments) in September. You can also rent it for weddings. Located in a pedestrian zone. Several paid parking facilities are located at about a 10 minute walk.
SPARK XTAVI (2 years ago)
Lovely place. I didn't knew I lived so close to City Square!
Kris Hadis (2 years ago)
Nice building with uniquely Dutch facade architecture
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