Rurikovo Gorodische

Veliky Novgorod, Russia

Rurikovo Gorodische (Рюриково городище, in Scandinavian sources known as Holmgård) is a settlement, an archaeological site of the 9th century in front of Yuriev Monastery. Including known as the residence of the princes of Novgorod, which is connected with the names of many famous political figures of ancient Russia.

Settlement begins with fortress 8th century, built by Ilmen Slavs and which had a wooden wall on the shaft. Until the 19th century the tract, as well as the adjacent village was called simply Settlement. The word Rurikovo was added at the beginning of the 19th century, influenced by legends which identify this place with the capital of the state of Rurik, after calling Vikings. The reason of such a relationship is one of the options for the interpretation of the Primary Chronicle of the vocation of Novgorod (in another version read 'The Tale of Bygone Years' this record applies to the Poconos) Prince Rurik in 862, which is the cause and date of the initial appearance of the legendary prince's residence on Settlement.

Today there are ruins of hill fort and ancient church on the site.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Russia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Михаил Раводин (21 months ago)
Посетив это место сразу вспоминаешь: "Здесь русский дух здесь русью пахнет". Простор, величие и спокойствие.
Adam Spears (21 months ago)
Accidently stepped in Rurik's footprint...Then I tripped & fell in the Volkhov. Got back on dry land & realized that my pants were missing. Looked over my shoulder & saw my pant being carried away by the Volkhov. At that time a nun came by & well, I'll let you guess what happened next...
Ria K (2 years ago)
Nice place
Kostya (2 years ago)
Подъезд перекрыт - надо бросать машину на обочине грунтовки и идти метров 500. Смотреть по большому счёту нечего. Есть восстановленная церковь, памчтный камень и смотровая площадка с текстовой информацией. Но съездить стоит - ведь это место с которого начиналась Русь.
Declan Murphy (4 years ago)
Amazing views of Novgorod and the surrounding countryside, lovely walk from the road to the 'Prince's Stone' which locals also used as a bike riding and walking route. Unfortunately the original viking church was being conserved at the time so unfortunately could not be seen, which would have been very nice. Very historic spot with plenty of interesting things to look at. It's worth noting that we were with a guide, all the historic information was written in Russian so if you're on your own and don't speak Russian that might detract from it a little.
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