Rurikovo Gorodische

Veliky Novgorod, Russia

Rurikovo Gorodische (Рюриково городище, in Scandinavian sources known as Holmgård) is a settlement, an archaeological site of the 9th century in front of Yuriev Monastery. Including known as the residence of the princes of Novgorod, which is connected with the names of many famous political figures of ancient Russia.

Settlement begins with fortress 8th century, built by Ilmen Slavs and which had a wooden wall on the shaft. Until the 19th century the tract, as well as the adjacent village was called simply Settlement. The word Rurikovo was added at the beginning of the 19th century, influenced by legends which identify this place with the capital of the state of Rurik, after calling Vikings. The reason of such a relationship is one of the options for the interpretation of the Primary Chronicle of the vocation of Novgorod (in another version read 'The Tale of Bygone Years' this record applies to the Poconos) Prince Rurik in 862, which is the cause and date of the initial appearance of the legendary prince's residence on Settlement.

Today there are ruins of hill fort and ancient church on the site.

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Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Russia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Максим Комов (3 years ago)
Great views over Volkhov river and opposite coast with Yuriev monastery! But not expect too much from modern reconstruction.
Tim (3 years ago)
The place is worth visiting. It's very close to Novgorod and it's easy to get there. You can feel the ancient history of this place. It will take you about half an hour to tour this place. It's too bad the information stand is in Russian only. Other than that it's a nice walk especially if the weather is good.
Andrey Kovalev (4 years ago)
Interesting place but only in the end of August, during National Folk Music and Art Festival
Arsenii Mustafin (4 years ago)
Creating ancients from nothing...
Михаил Раводин (4 years ago)
Посетив это место сразу вспоминаешь: "Здесь русский дух здесь русью пахнет". Простор, величие и спокойствие.
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