The Antoniev Monastery rivalled the Yuriev Monastery as the most important monastery of medieval Novgorod the Great. It stands along the right bank of the Volkhov River north of the city centre and forms part of the Historic Monuments of Novgorod and Surroundings, a World Heritage Site.

The monastery was founded in 1117 by St. Anthony of Rome (Antony Rimlyanin), who, according to legend, flew to Novgorod from Rome on a rock (the alleged rock is now in the vestibule just to the right of the main door into the Church of the Nativity of the Mother of God beneath a fresco of Bishop Nikita of Novgorod). Antonii was consecrated hegumen of the monastery in 1131 by Archbishop Nifont (1130–1156) and was buried beneath a large slab to the right of tha altar in the same church.

The Church of the Nativity of the Mother of God, like the Church of St. George in the Yuriev Monastery, is one of the few three-domed churches in Russia. It is also one of the few buildings in Russia which survived from the 12th century. It was founded by Antonii in 1117 and completed in 1119. There are some frescoes from the Middle Ages still extant, most notably in the apse, but most are from the 16th or 17th centuries and are in some disrepair.

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Founded: 1117
Category: Religious sites in Russia

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Е. Tayler (16 months ago)
К сожалению оба храма были закрыты.В одном из них музей.Хоть и обозначенно,что должен работать,но висел на двери большой замок.Территорию в основном занимает Гуманитарный институт.
Сергей Шутов (2 years ago)
Всегда восхищаюсь этим местом
Maksim Antipov (2 years ago)
Выдающийся памятник церковной архитектуры.
Irina Kushnariov (2 years ago)
Спасибо, очень интересно! В пределе этого храма похоронен один из моих предков-Николай Афанасьевич Завалишин. А ещё один из предков Андрей Иеринархович Завалишин был декабристов, если у Вас есть о нем какие-то сведения, как с Вами связаться?
Sa Pr (3 years ago)
Great cathedral open for tourists, has a lot of interesting old fresco paintings
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