Fort Thüngen is a historic fortification in Luxembourg City sited in Dräi Eechelen Park. Named after the Austrian commander-in-chief of the fortress, Baron of Thüngen, it was built in 1732 to enclose the defence work called Redoute du Parc (Park Redoubt) set up by Vauban 50 years before. A deep moat surrounded Fort Thüngen which was accessible only through a 169-metre long underground tunnel through the rocks from Obergrünewald. In 1836 the Prussians extended the Fort and in 1860 strengthened it again.

Most of the original fortress was demolished after the 1867 Treaty of London, which demanded the demolition of Luxembourg City's numerous fortifications. The three towers and the foundations of the rest of the fort were all that remained. During the 1990s, the site was reconstructed in its entirety, in parallel with the development of the site for the construction of the Mudam, Luxembourg's museum of modern art.

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Founded: 1732
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Levente Berky (17 months ago)
In the winter doesn't looks as cool as in summer. The historical museum inside is fine. The best thing that I found was a table with Lux on it and a projector. It was a time elapse where you were able to follow the expansion of the city from 1200 to 1700.
Matthew Harmon (18 months ago)
Museum is worth a visit if you are already here. Fort is pretty well preserved, modern art museum had been built on top of part of it
Garry (2 years ago)
Fantastic museum. Located inside of Fort Thungen, one of the cities outermost forts it really brought to life the history of the city. There is a great few from the top of the fort down into the valley. We went to the museum in the dead of winter, the place was really quiet. I would recommend going to the museum in the morning or early afternoon. The fort around the museum is very poorly lit. We approached and left the museum from the city side following the Vauban walk and the fort was all but abandoned when we were walking to it and on the way back following the same path there is no lighting at all and noone around.
Yazan (2 years ago)
A very cool museum both on the outside and on the inside. The ticket is 5€ only and free for students. There are so many good things that deserve a close look.
Mady Weydert (2 years ago)
One of my favourite places, as a kid we regularly came here just for family picnics,so I'm a bit biased... The view is stunning, it's amazing how they could incorporate the old fortress into the new buildings, like the Museum of Modern Arts. It's well done and everyone should visit it at least once!
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