Fort Thüngen is a historic fortification in Luxembourg City sited in Dräi Eechelen Park. Named after the Austrian commander-in-chief of the fortress, Baron of Thüngen, it was built in 1732 to enclose the defence work called Redoute du Parc (Park Redoubt) set up by Vauban 50 years before. A deep moat surrounded Fort Thüngen which was accessible only through a 169-metre long underground tunnel through the rocks from Obergrünewald. In 1836 the Prussians extended the Fort and in 1860 strengthened it again.

Most of the original fortress was demolished after the 1867 Treaty of London, which demanded the demolition of Luxembourg City's numerous fortifications. The three towers and the foundations of the rest of the fort were all that remained. During the 1990s, the site was reconstructed in its entirety, in parallel with the development of the site for the construction of the Mudam, Luxembourg's museum of modern art.

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Founded: 1732
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Levente Berky (20 months ago)
In the winter doesn't looks as cool as in summer. The historical museum inside is fine. The best thing that I found was a table with Lux on it and a projector. It was a time elapse where you were able to follow the expansion of the city from 1200 to 1700.
Matthew Harmon (21 months ago)
Museum is worth a visit if you are already here. Fort is pretty well preserved, modern art museum had been built on top of part of it
Garry (2 years ago)
Fantastic museum. Located inside of Fort Thungen, one of the cities outermost forts it really brought to life the history of the city. There is a great few from the top of the fort down into the valley. We went to the museum in the dead of winter, the place was really quiet. I would recommend going to the museum in the morning or early afternoon. The fort around the museum is very poorly lit. We approached and left the museum from the city side following the Vauban walk and the fort was all but abandoned when we were walking to it and on the way back following the same path there is no lighting at all and noone around.
Yazan (2 years ago)
A very cool museum both on the outside and on the inside. The ticket is 5€ only and free for students. There are so many good things that deserve a close look.
Mady Weydert (2 years ago)
One of my favourite places, as a kid we regularly came here just for family picnics,so I'm a bit biased... The view is stunning, it's amazing how they could incorporate the old fortress into the new buildings, like the Museum of Modern Arts. It's well done and everyone should visit it at least once!
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Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.