Fort Thüngen is a historic fortification in Luxembourg City sited in Dräi Eechelen Park. Named after the Austrian commander-in-chief of the fortress, Baron of Thüngen, it was built in 1732 to enclose the defence work called Redoute du Parc (Park Redoubt) set up by Vauban 50 years before. A deep moat surrounded Fort Thüngen which was accessible only through a 169-metre long underground tunnel through the rocks from Obergrünewald. In 1836 the Prussians extended the Fort and in 1860 strengthened it again.

Most of the original fortress was demolished after the 1867 Treaty of London, which demanded the demolition of Luxembourg City's numerous fortifications. The three towers and the foundations of the rest of the fort were all that remained. During the 1990s, the site was reconstructed in its entirety, in parallel with the development of the site for the construction of the Mudam, Luxembourg's museum of modern art.

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Founded: 1732
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Santosh Rane (9 months ago)
I'm not much into the history. But just walking up in fresh air and lush green park with a lovely view of Luxembourg, is worth a visit here.
Chris (9 months ago)
Fun and free history museum. Very Luxembourg focused, great place to stop in…doesn’t take long to visit. I went with my 8 year old and spent 30-45 minutes. He liked the guillotine the most — they do what with that?!?
Richard E (10 months ago)
A beautiful piece of art and history restored to be a lesson of a time that once was. We thoroughly enjoyed walking through this amazing museum.
Csaba Győrfi (10 months ago)
Beautiful slice of history, old fortification of the city. Fort is really interesting both from outside and inside if you like this kind of stuff. 1-2 hours easily spent here if walking around inside’n’out of the structure. Close to the city center by foot.
JB Young (12 months ago)
They do not recognize the American COVID vaccine cards for proof of vaccination. I was denied entry. The outside looks cool though.
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