Haamstede Castle (Slot Haamstede) was built originally in the 12th century and it probably consisted of a wooden keep on a motte, circled by a moat. There is also archeological evidence of Roman habitation on this site. Around 1200 this castle came into the possession of Floris IV, Count of Holland. In 1229 the castle went to the Lords of Zierikzee through an exchange with Floris IV. The new inhabitants of the castle called themselves Van Haamstede.

The castle was destroyed by fire in 1525. Only the keep, built in the 13th century, survived. The other castle was rebuilt in the 17th century. The keep was provided with 2 square towers on both sides. The smallest one served as a stair tower. During the 19th and 20th century the castle was renovated twice until it got its present appearance.

At present Haamstede Castle is owned by the Vereniging Natuurmonumenten, a society for the preservation of nature monuments in the Netherlands.

 

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

More Information

www.castles.nl

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3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Björn Peters (13 months ago)
War geschlossen als wir dort waren. Sieht schon sehr imposant aus und schön, wenn so alte Gebäude erhalten werden.
Stefanus (2 years ago)
Leuke historische plaats in Burgh-Haamstede. In de vakantie, wanneer je tijd hebt, zeker de moeite waard.
H Smits (2 years ago)
Leuk te zien. Mooi
Catharina van Oorschot (2 years ago)
Prachtig kasteel en bijzonder mooi gelegen. Jammer dat we er niet in konden.
ad van goch (2 years ago)
Ongelooflijk dat vanochtend ca. 15 mensen tevergeefs stonden te wachten bij de poort van het Slot zonder dat er iemand van Natuurmonumenten kwam opdagen. Bij de VVV was niet bekend wie de rondleiding gaf.
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