Male Castle was almost entirely rebuilt and restored after the destruction of World War II. It has housed St. Trudo's Abbey since 1954.

The castle's origins date back to the 9th century, as a defensive tower for protection of the territory around Bruges against the Vikings. Male was held by Philip of Alsace, Count of Flanders, between 1168 and 1191, who replaced the wooden structure with one built of stone, which included a chapel consecrated by the exiled archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, in 1166.

The castle was a residence of the Counts of Flanders (in 1329 it was the birthplace of Count Louis II, sometimes known as Louis of Male) but was also a stronghold in a much-disputed terrain. French forces occupied it. The city of Bruges retook it from its French garrison in the uprising of 1302. Soldiers from Ghent razed it in 1382 and after it had been rebuilt, ransacked it again in 1453. In 1473 it was burnt out and once again rebuilt: the present keep dates from that rebuilding, and stands with its foundations directly in the moat, now flanked by symmetrical wings. The castle was plundered yet again in 1490 by the forces of the Count of Nassau.

When Flanders became a part of the Burgundian Netherlands Male retained its importance. During the Spanish occupation of the Low Countries, the citadel was sold in 1558 by Philip II to Juan Lopez Gallo.

It was occupied by German troops in both world wars, and was severely damaged. The castle was comprehensively restored after World War II and since 1954 has accommodated St. Trudo's Abbey, a house of the Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulchre.

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Details

Founded: c. 1166
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

linda schamps (2 years ago)
A special place, a pity that people cannot enter the domain, then I walked a bit on the path, until I saw the sign "forbidden access" hanging on the trees for the third time, then I returned, I could have done some nice pictures take.
Els Roelandt (2 years ago)
Not much to see unfortunately
Marie cilou boterberg (2 years ago)
Beautiful and relaxing!
Emilie Rombaux (2 years ago)
Beautiful and relaxing!
Guido Emanuel Sanchez (2 years ago)
It is private and is completely covered by vegetation. It can not even be seen from the outside
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