The Oostkerk was designed by Bartholomeus Drijfhout and Pieter Post and was built between 1648 and 1667. After Drijfhout died in 1651, the building was continued under the Leiden architect Arent van 's Gravezande, who had just completed the Marekerk in Leiden. The white organ was built by Gebr. de Rijckere from Kortrijk in 1782. Two stained glass windows from 1664 still exist in the church, and the klokkenstoel contains a bell by C. Noorden and one by J.A. de Grave, 1715.

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Founded: 1648-1667
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaap Van De Hoef (2 years ago)
Mooie kerk
Carlos Alves (2 years ago)
De uma beleza, expectacular
Sebastian Whitmire (2 years ago)
schöne kirche
Константин Петрович (3 years ago)
Beautiful church, but opened only during warm season
Niels Bergervoet (3 years ago)
Schitterend voorbeeld van Nederlandse zeventiende eeuwse architectuur. Imposant gebouw van binnen en van buiten. Gratis entree en voor een paar euro kun je een rondleiding krijgen (dat laatste zagen we pas achteraf).
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