Château Neercanne (also known as Agimont) was built on a site that was already in use by the Romans. The caves, created by mining blocks to build the fortifications, still exist. They are now in use as the wine cellar of Neercanne. In 1465 the castle was destroyed by the people of Liège during the Liège Wars. The outbuildings and the prominent corner tower were built in 1611, in the style of the Mosan Renaissance. The main building was built in 1698 by Daniël Wolf van Dopff, lord of Neercanne, at that time the military governor of Maastricht. All present buildings are built from marl. In the valley in front of the castle flows the river Jeker and is a baroque garden, reconstructed to the original design. Today It is a fine dining restaurant that is awarded one or two Michelin stars in the periods 1957-1982 and 1986–present.

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Founded: 1611-1698
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

W Janssen (2 years ago)
Fabulous location with excellent food
Walhalla Dome (2 years ago)
We had always had an absolute great time there. Top location.
Steve Conley (2 years ago)
We had the 8 course meal with wine. Came on a Sunday and received world class service. Staff were very accommodating to a gluten allergy in our party. Beautiful building, garden, and wine cellar. The staff even gave us a brief tour! Food was amazing. Highly recommend for a special occasion.
Raymond Nieuwenhuizen (3 years ago)
Wow, what an elegant setting high on a hill above Maastricht, with French food to die for. Super!
C A (3 years ago)
Amazing dinner / lunch menu. The interior is just fabulous and in summer the terrace is just splendid. Totally recommend in all seasons.
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