The Bovenkerk (also known as the Church of St. Nicholas) is a large Gothic church and the most striking element on the skyline of Kampen. The interior of the church contains an early-Renaissance choir screen, a stone pulpit and a monumental organ. The church has 1,250 seats. It is a Reformed church.

The construction of the church took place in several phases. The 12th century Romanesque church was modified as Early Gothic church in the late 1200s. The basilica choir was added in the last quarter of 14th century and the construction completed in the second half 15th century.

A common practice for old historic churches was to bury the dead under the Church. The Bovenkerk is no exception to this practice, where famous Dutch persons originating from Kampen are buried. One of them is Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634), one of the first landscape painters of the 17th-century Dutch school, specialized in painting the Netherlands in winter. The transept contains a small ornament of red marble with a green marble urn in memory of Vice Admiral Jan Willem de Winter (1761-1812). The heart of Vice Admiral De Winter is enclosed in this urn, while his body is buried in the Panthéon in Paris.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ryan Liberati (2 years ago)
This is a very beautiful church on the outside. Sadly it is locked during the day
Tony Familia (2 years ago)
Really nice photo Ops of this church.
Oluwabukunmi Popoola (5 years ago)
What a memorable place to spend Reformation Sunday.
sommmen (5 years ago)
Quite beatiful church that they renovated a while a go, so it can last many years more.
Jack Kawira (5 years ago)
A very beautiful Church
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