The Bovenkerk (also known as the Church of St. Nicholas) is a large Gothic church and the most striking element on the skyline of Kampen. The interior of the church contains an early-Renaissance choir screen, a stone pulpit and a monumental organ. The church has 1,250 seats. It is a Reformed church.

The construction of the church took place in several phases. The 12th century Romanesque church was modified as Early Gothic church in the late 1200s. The basilica choir was added in the last quarter of 14th century and the construction completed in the second half 15th century.

A common practice for old historic churches was to bury the dead under the Church. The Bovenkerk is no exception to this practice, where famous Dutch persons originating from Kampen are buried. One of them is Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634), one of the first landscape painters of the 17th-century Dutch school, specialized in painting the Netherlands in winter. The transept contains a small ornament of red marble with a green marble urn in memory of Vice Admiral Jan Willem de Winter (1761-1812). The heart of Vice Admiral De Winter is enclosed in this urn, while his body is buried in the Panthéon in Paris.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gert Kragt (20 months ago)
Prachtige mooie monumentale kerk
Bart van Herk (21 months ago)
Eerbiedwaardige grote oude kerk, sinds kort niet meer als zodanig in gebruik, het werd voor de religieuze gemeente te duur.. Nauwelijks warm te stoken; en akoestisch gezien een zeer lange nagalmtijd, wat het voor muziekuitvoeringen een eigen karakter geeft. Minder geschikt voor levendige muziek met zeer snelle passages. Niet te snelle koormuziek of vocaal kan daarentegen zeer fraai klinken. Een belangrijk stuk historie, lokaal en nationaal.
Marijke Strijd-Kahlé (2 years ago)
Schitterend orgel waar concerten gegeven worden
Pieter van der Valk (3 years ago)
Nice church with a beautiful and impressive large organ. When I visited the church the smaller was being played. This gave a great atmosphere.
Albert Riezebos (4 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral
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