Calais Lighthouse

Calais, France

Calais Lighthouse is a significant landmark as well as a navigational aid to ships and ferries using the Straits of Dover. There was a beacon at the summit of the watchtower from 1818. King Louis-Philippe in his plans to improve French ports decided the construction of a first-class lighthouse in Calais. This lighthouse started operating in 1848 and was electrified in 1883. After escaping the destruction of the Second World War it was automated in 1987.

The lighthouse is 53m high, its tower is octagonal outside and round inside with walls 1,90m at the base and 1,50m at the summit. The foundations descend 7,40m under the cellars. The staircase has 271 steps leading up to the lantern. The central light of the lighthouse is permanent and the lantern, whose panels shut off the light, turns around the light, giving 4 flashes of 2/10th of a second every 15 seconds.

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    Founded: 1848
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    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Diana Hernández (2 years ago)
    There are great views from the city and the beach, the guide explained us the history of Calais, the lighthouse and the important buildings and palces you could see. Maybe some repairs are needed in the exposition of the beginning, but the service and views are something exceptional. You don't need the best condition to go upstairs, but I would recommend to not push yourself. Sometimes it can get very windy, so keep everything as best as you can.
    Tim Riches (3 years ago)
    Great place to go
    Ivan Layne (3 years ago)
    What a view! It was cold and windy but still a great visit.
    Nicholas Ho (4 years ago)
    A beautiful building for sure, with much historical significance. I came to visit on a 'summer' day, the 28th of September, at 6pm on the dot. Despite the opening hours being stated as 6.30pm,i was rejected from entering. Nevertheless, the staff were polite about it. Perhaps next time.
    Perfect Rice (4 years ago)
    I found this by far the best place to visit in Calais, and I very much enjoyed my visit to the town. I'm a sucker for a good view, and the view from here was excellent. A full 360 degree look over the town and the channel. I was the only English person being shown around and the guide explained everything to me in perfect English. She even let me have some more time to admire the view while she did the French section of the tour. The tour itself was very enjoyable. Lots of very interesting information. The guide was extremely helpful and friendly. I spent ages taking pictures, but she didn't complain, even when I didn't realise it was after their closing time. If you're in Calais (and not scared of heights) I would definitely recommend a visit here.
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