Église Notre-Dame

Calais, France

Église Notre-Dame ('The Church of Our Lady') dates from the 12th century, and chiefly from the 14th century. It is a sample of Tudor architecture due Calais was part of England for centuries. The church was damaged during the early wars between France and England, especially in 1346-47, after the Battle of Crécy. Many of the kings and queens of France and England prayed here; and John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners is buried in the church choir.

The church is large and has a fortress-like appearance. Its layout is in the shape of a Latin cross. There is a large nave with aisles, north and south transepts, a choir with choir-aisles, and a side chapel. A notable feature is the high altar, mostly completed by 1626, which has carvings and bas-relief. A pedestal and a statue are dated 1628, while two other statues were added in 1629, and the balustrades finished in 1648. Among the works of art is a painting by Peter Paul Rubens of the Descent from the Cross.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

chazz bell (3 years ago)
Nice to see the Charles de gaulle memorial
Tia Sutherland-king (3 years ago)
Worth a walk around
ADRIAN GAGE (3 years ago)
Worth a look around, free small bus service to the monument around the town
Michael Fox (3 years ago)
Beautiful church and Tudor gardens
Anju Desai (3 years ago)
Amazing church undergoing renovation but still working as a church in an alter behind the main alter. The ceiling is without beams. The arches support the ceiling. The latice window is in black and blue. The energy in the church is very peaceful and with a church service in the background ..a very beautiful experience. The gardens outside are a must visit too. The place is near the reservoir for water storage.
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