Kiek in de Kök

Tallinn, Estonia

Kiek in de Kök is an artillery tower built between 1475 and 1483. It is 38 m high and has walls 4 m thick. Cannon balls dating back to 1577 are still embedded in its outer walls. Compared to the other Tallinn towers Kiek in de Kök was predominant in its fire power, due to its 27 embrasures for cannons and 30 for handguns

Kiek in de Kök (low German Peep into the Kitchen ) is an old German language nickname for towers, mainly those which were parts of town fortifications. They gained the name from the ability of the tower occupants to literally see what's cooking in the kitchens of nearby houses.

Due to the history of the Hanseatic League and the Teutonic Order, also towers far outside modern Germany bear this name, like in Gdańsk and Tallinn.

20th century restoration work saw the tower and surrounding area returned to a more historical look. The tower now serves as a museum and photographic gallery.

References: Wikipedia, Official Website

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Details

Founded: 1475-1483
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Liina Kink (2 years ago)
An amazing museum with lots of interesting things to see. They also do guided tours in a variety of languages - English, Estonian, Russian, Finnish, etc. I had an amazing day :) just remember to notify them in advance if you want to go into the bastion as the spots are limited. I had a lot of fun!
Erik U (2 years ago)
Excellent tour guide who took us down to the bastions. Our favorite museum out of the tallinn city pass. Do the guided tour if available, it is worth the time.
J DeChicchis (2 years ago)
The towers house some various artifacts, including old swords, cannons, and even WW2-era firearms. The catapults are especially interesting. There are also some stocks and torture devices. One upper floor has a scale model reconstruction of the entire presumed wall and towers. There are two cafe areas with wonderful views of the city. Below ground, the English-language tour of the tunnels is excellent.
Alex Hell (2 years ago)
I'm not going to call it a tourist trap (it's definitely not) but I wouldn't call it a "not to be missed experience" either. If anything the video in the start of the tour is thoroughly entertaining but the tour guide although she was clearly doing her best had clearly had enough of it. I wish they would just let us roam around like an art gallery.
oli fubar (2 years ago)
The whole experience was very informative and fun. We went to do the tunnels but the last English tour had already left. We ended up doing the towers and walls then returning the next morning to explorer the passages. The passage tour starts with a history of Tallinn video before entering the tunnels. The tour was based mainly on their use over the last 100 years and not medieval times but still very interesting.
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