The Grote Kerk of Harderwijk is a gothic cross-basilica, dating from the 14th and 15th century. Around 1435 work started on building a tower for the new church, which took five years to finish. In 1560 and 1561, when the roof was repaired, Ewolt van Delft painted the vaults. His paintings concern unique biblical tales. In 1578, Reformation took place in Harderwijk, and from that moment on the church has only been used for Protestant worship. During a thunderstorm on the 28th of January 1797, the east wall of the tower collapsed, together with half of the nave. Later the north and south wall followed, whereupon with a cannon shot the western wall was brought down. Only 2/5 of the old nave remained. It was enclosed with a new wall and a facade in a sober Louis XVI style.

In the period between 1967-1980, the church was restored thoroughly. During this restoration the unique ceiling paintings of Ewolt van Delft, hidden under layers whitewash, were revealed. In 1797, when the tower collapsed, the organ was buried under the debris. In 1824, an organ commission was formed and in 1825 the Bätz brothers from Utrecht were contracted to construct a new organ. On the 28th of January 1827, exactly 30 years after the collapse of the tower, the new organ was inaugurated. It had 23 stops, spread over two manuals and pedal. In 1891 the organ was restored and modifications took place.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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www.pleasuresofthepipes.info

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User Reviews

Goossen Foppen (17 months ago)
I grew up in this church, Via the church radio. Started with omeHenderik Petersen (cap). Later I got it on loan myself. That was because of my epilepsy I had then. Well I wander from church to church building, Who goes out into the triune God. The father the son and the Holy Spirit. Amen
Kees de Vries (21 months ago)
Nice church
Henk Grasdijk (21 months ago)
Nice church. Great acoustics
Pedro John Meijer (2 years ago)
Fantastic monument, beautifully restored.
Alexander Richvalský (2 years ago)
beautiful carillon!
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