Kadriorg Palace

Tallinn, Estonia

Catherinethal ("Catherine's valley") is a Petrine Baroque palace of Catherine I of Russia in Tallinn. It was built after the Great Northern War to Nicola Michetti's designs by Gaetano Chiaveri and Mikhail Zemtsov. In the 20th century the Estonian version of the name, Kadriorg, gained currency and came to be applied to the surrounding district.

After the successful siege of Reval in 1710 Peter the Great of Russia bought a Dutch-style manor house at Lasnamäe for his wife Catherine. The house today is the result of a drastic renovation ordered by Nicholas I of Russia in 1827.

The new palace was started on 25 July 1718. Peter and Catherine visited the unfinished residence on several occasions, but after the emperor's death in 1725 Catherine showed no interest in the seaside property. The great hall with Catherine's initials and profuse stucco decor (attributed to Heinrich von Bergen) survives, but many other interiors have been altered. The gardener Ilya Surmin was responsible for the flower garden with two fountains and the so-called mirage garden on several levels. The layout of the park shares similarities with that of Strelna.

The palace currently houses an art gallery. The KUMU Museum is sited in the park.

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Details

Founded: 1718
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

K K (2 months ago)
Beautiful Palace. The expositions change here and are always worth visiting. Sometimes there are concerts in the main hall of the castle. It is very beautiful both inside and outside. Surrounded by parks and flour garden it makes Kadriorg Tallinns most beautiful region.
Pille Leišovnieks (2 months ago)
Beatiful place. Incredible for concerts and art expositions. Souvenirs available. Nice picnic and walking area.
Simon Tonkinson (2 months ago)
This place is quite a spectacular house, built apparently by Peter the Great, with some Italian influences. Gardens are a wonderful example of a formal garden, fountains and statues etc. Interior is also very grand with sculpture etc inside. Certainly on the list of places to visit if you are ever in Tallinn
Elena Volkova (3 months ago)
Beautiful park! Get tickets online, otherwise you’ll have to stand in a long queue to get inside (in the summer at least). Was pleasantly surprised by the amount of elderly people who strolled in the park.
Christian Friedli (4 months ago)
A place like in a fairytale, but real. The beautiful garden can be visited for free. They celebrate 300 years Kadriorg and after it was the residence of the Estonian president, Catherine's summer residence (after her it is named after all), the home the foreign forces demonstrated their dominance it is open for art lovers and those who want to experience more of history.
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