Dominican Monastery

Tallinn, Estonia

The Dominican monastery was founded in 1246 and it is the oldest one in the medieval old town. The center of monastery was St. Catherine's Church, which was completed in the late 1300s and was the largest church building in the lower town. The Monastery was expanded several times, most recently in the 16th century.

St. Catherine's convent closed down in 1525, when the monks were expelled from Tallinn during the Reformation. The looted and empty monastery church was destroyed by fire in 1531 - only ruins were left.

There were originally three inner chambers (together so-called claustrum) in the monastery allowed only for residents. The claustrum housed the most important rooms in the monastery: the prior’s room, the old library, the chapter hall, the dormitory, the sacristy, the cloister and the vestry. In the 14th and 15th centuries the leaders of the knight guilds of Harju and Virumaa often used the claustrum as their meeting and gathering place.

Only the eastern chamber has been preserved to our days. The dormitory, library, dining room and other rooms provide a fascinating opportunity to take a peek into the life of medieval monks. A mysterious "energy column" is located in the basement. According the legend it can be a source of physical and mental well-being.

References: VisitEstonia, ABC Matkatoimisto

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Kielimaisteri said 5 years ago
Thanks for the comment, the photo is changed now!

Revalerin said 6 years ago
The middle photo does not depict the Dominican Monastery. It shows the Tallinn townwall with two defencetowers, Maidentower (Neitritorn) and Kiek in de Kök. The photo was taken from the Danish King`s Garden. The monastery is about 7 minutes walk from there :).


Details

Founded: 1246
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J. Castillo (2 years ago)
Impresionante Claustro, del monasterio donde lo antiguo es bello y bien conservado y donde hay una persona que se encarga de ello, donde hacerse unas fotos y dejar una donación y no una obligación, merece la pena debes de Ir
Common Sense (2 years ago)
Vahva koht, tekitab tõelise ajaloos olemise tunde. Üks põnevamatest nurgatagustest Tallinna Vanalinnas.
Olchik Bogomolchik (3 years ago)
Обязательное место к посещению в Старом городе! Очень завораживающие и историческое место, особенно красивый монастырь в летний период, когда много зелени вокруг! Я родом из Таллинна, но частенько гуляю и заглядываю в этот монастырь!
Sou S (3 years ago)
Interesting place with tranquil feel. Run by the public museum organization or institute now, not by Church.
Elena Punty (3 years ago)
One of the most eerily beautiful and peaceful places in all of Tallinn. Small, but the courtyard is free. To get into the Monestary is cheap (a few euro?) and lots of beautiful stone work. A quiet and beautiful respite from the tourist crowds out in the streets.
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