Blatnica Castle Ruins

Blatnica, Slovakia

Blatnica castle was built in the 13th century to protect a major trade route running from Nitra to the north. Soon afterwards it became a royal castle but the kings lost their interest in the castle's development after a new route, through Mošovce and Martin was built. The new owners of Blatnica Castle, the Révay family (from 1540), were more generous and the castle was significantly extended in the second half of the 16th century. The last reconstruction dated from 1744. Since 1790 the castle has been abandoned and has turned into ruins.

The castle is built on typo low ridge of Plešovica which separates the Turiec Basin from the Greater Fatra Range. It is freely accessible from the village of Blatnica by a marked footpath. The castle remnants are hidden in a forest with limited views at the Gader Valley, which stretches underneath, and the opposite Tlstá Mountain.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lubomir Kovacik (17 months ago)
Ok
Ryan Vardy (2 years ago)
Lovely visit very fascinating they would do any restoration work why we wear well this is team which was interesting to see
dusan dvorsky (2 years ago)
Nice historical site
Martin Laššák (2 years ago)
Easily accessible by bike or hiking, the castle gets renovated. The place also offers breathtaking views of Gader valley. Some 10 minutes down the forest road there is a shed offering some meals.
Matúš Staš (2 years ago)
Adventurous journey
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