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Château de Trélon

Trélon, France

Château de Trélon originates from the 11th century, when it was owned by the d"Avesnes family. In 1478 the castle was besieged by John of Luxembourg. It has been damaged, burned and rebuilt serveral times during the history. The current castle was built in the early 1700s.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antoine Marie-Claire (3 years ago)
Très beau château mais je n'ai pu voir l'intérieur car pas d'accès pour les personnes à mobilités réduites je dois avouer qu'ils nous ont contactés très gentiment après avoir lu mon avis afin de me faire rentrer par l'arrière du château car l'accès y est plus facile ce que les remercie beaucoup
Joelle Zielowski (3 years ago)
Für 8 Euro kann man ein Führung mitmachen. Die Blaublüter wohnen noch selbst hier und zu bestimmten Zeiten ist das Chateau zu besichtigen. Mehr Informationen findet man auf der eigenen Webseite.
Marc Decottignies (3 years ago)
L intérêt de visiter des pièces toujours utilisées et habitées et donc meublées d époque où rénovées avec style. Très intéressant.
Ivilina Boneva (3 years ago)
I was in live with the place already when I saw the outside, but the story of the family, and the charm of the still-in-use château are something to remember. If you are in the area, you can't miss this place!
Cédric Dessez (3 years ago)
Visite extrêmement intéressante et divertissante que nous avons la chance de faire avec l'héritier de la famille. Les anecdotes et histoires relatées sont délicieuses d'authenticité et nous plonge vraiment dans leur univers. Je recommande fortement !
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