Maarjamäe Palace

Tallinn, Estonia

Maarjamäe or Orlov’s Palace was commissioned by Count Anatoli Orlov-Davydov from St. Petersburg. The historicist limestone summer residence on the seashore was designed by architect Robert Gödicke. In the 1930s the building housed a magnificent restaurant – the Riviera Palace. In 1937 the Estonian Air force Flying School obtained the building, the Soviet Army took over in 1940. The restored palace opened its doors to the public as a branch museum of the Estonian History Museum in 1987. Today it holds permanent and temporary exhibitions about Estonian history.

Reference: Viroweb

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Address

Maarjamäe 8, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1874
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nadine G (2 years ago)
Nicely renovated museum. Unusual exhibition of contemporary history.
Nicolas Roth (2 years ago)
Great Exhibition on the History of Estonia. The museum is very interactive so it is perfect for kids.
Raul Liive (2 years ago)
Great place to go with kids.
Tornike Mzhavia (2 years ago)
Great place to see the timeline of Estonian history, cinematography and music. Very kid friendly. Plan at least 3 hours to see everything.
Matis Palm (2 years ago)
A very lovely ex-summer manor that has been fully renovated, didn't get to see the inside of the museum much, but the restaurant and outsides are great!
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