Lembecksburg was a medieval ring wall with a diameter of 95 meters and a height of ten meters. According to old lore, it was constructed in the 9th century as a stronghold against the Vikings and is named after the knight Klaus Lembeck who had allegedly been residing there as a steward of king Valdemar IV of Denmark in the 14th century. After breaking his feudal oath, though, Lembeck is said to have been besieged by the king's host. Ít is disputed though whether Lembeck ever set foot on the island. Archaeological findings on Sylt island in the late 1970s suggest, however, that the Lembecksburg and similar facilities on Sylt date back to the days of the Roman Empire.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Wolken-Damm, Borgsum, Germany
See all sites in Borgsum

Details

Founded: 9-10th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: East Francia (Germany)

More Information

www.borgsum-auf-foehr.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerd-Holger Siebert (4 months ago)
Relikt aus der Vergangenheit sehenswert
Michael Ortmann (5 months ago)
Guter Ausblick auf Wikinger und Ritterzeiten, eine echte Aussicht auf diese Zeiten, leider zu wenig Infomaterial da es auch in der Hinterlandschaft liegt. Aber Mann kann sich vorstellen wie die Häuser darin aufgebaut waren. Gut das mal gesehen zu haben.
Jana Wagner (10 months ago)
Als ich auf die Burg zuging fühlte ich mich mächtig und war von der Umgebung sehr fasziniert. Ich habe vorab gelesen das Ausgrabungen sichtbar wären. Leider war davon nichts zu erkennen sodass es am Ende nur wie ein Kreis im Grünen wirkte.
Karl Plasser (10 months ago)
Es war für mich spannend zu erkennen, dass diese Burg schon da war, als Föhr noch keine Insel war - eine faszinierende Vorstellung. Die Schautafel ist gut geschrieben und informativ. Wem die Geschichte egal ist, der hat den Ausflug trotzdem nicht vergebens gemacht. Der Blick ins Land ist durch die Erhebung Recht schön.
Toni Felder (12 months ago)
Sehr ruhiger Ort. Beim Betrachten und Herumwandern kann man sich gut vorstellen wie es hier mal gewesen sein könnte. Auf dem Wall hat man eine sehr gute Fernsicht.....
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Moszna Castle

The Moszna Castle is one of the best known monuments in the western part of Upper Silesia. The history of this building begins in the 17th century, although much older cellars were found in the gardens during excavations carried out at the beginning of the 20th century. Some of the investigators, including H. Barthel, claimed that those cellars could have been remnants of a presumed Templar castle, but their theory has never been proved. After World War II, further excavations discovered a medieval palisade.

The central part of the castle is an old baroque palace which was partially destroyed by fire on the night of April 2, 1896 and was reconstructed in the same year in its original form by Franz Hubert von Tiele-Winckler. The reconstruction works involved an extension of the residence. The eastern Neogothic-styled wing of the building was built by 1900, along with an adjacent orangery. In 1912-1914, the western wing was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. The architectural form of the castle contains a wide variety of styles, thus it can be generally defined as eclectic.

The height of the building, as well as its numerous turrets and spires, give the impression of verticalism. The whole castle has exactly ninety-nine turrets. Inside, it contains 365 rooms. The castle was twice visited by the German Emperor Wilhelm II. His participation in hunting during his stay at the castle was documented in a hand-written chronicle in 1911 as well as in the following year. The castle in Moszna was the residence of a Silesian family Tiele-Winckler who were industrial magnates, from 1866 until the spring of 1945 when they were forced to move to Germany and the castle was occupied by the Red Army. The period of the Soviet control caused significant damage to the castle's internal fittings in comparison to the minor damage caused by WWII.

After World War II the castle did not have a permanent owner and was the home of various institutions until 1972 when it became a convalescent home. Later it became a Public Health Care Centre for Therapies of Neuroses. Nowadays it can be visited by tourists since the health institution has moved to another building in the neighbourhood. The castle also has a chapel which is used as a concert hall. Since 1998 the castle housed a gallery in which works of various artists are presented at regular exhibitions.

Apart from the castle itself, the entire complex includes a park which has no precise boundaries and includes nearby fields, meadows and a forest. Only the main axis of the park can be characterised as geometrical. Starting from the gate, it leads along the oak and then horse-chestnut avenues, towards the castle. Further on, the park passes into an avenue of lime trees with symmetrical canals running along both sides of the path, lined with a few varieties of rhododendrons. The axis of the park terminates at the base of a former monument of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler. On the eastern side of the avenue there is a pond with an islet referred to by the owners as Easter Island. The islet is planted with needle-leaved shrubs and can be reached by a Chinese-styled bridge. The garden, as part of the whole park complex was restored slightly earlier than the castle itself. Preserved documents of 1868 state that the improvement in the garden's aesthetic quality was undertaken by Hubert von Tiele-Winckler.