St. Clemens Church

Rømø, Denmark

Rømø church was built around 1200 but extended in the 17th and 18th centuries when the island prospered due to whaling. The church is consecrated to the patron saint of sailors, St. Clemens and many ship models, donated by seamen, are hanging in the church. During the last century, rights to have one's name on a church pew were sold, the proceeds being used for church expenses, and many of these can be seen on the pews in the church today. Very interesting churchyard with old headstones of the ship commanders and their families, British and German pilots from World War II.

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Address

Havnebyvej 152, Rømø, Denmark
See all sites in Rømø

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.fr

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ali Ebrahimi (2 years ago)
The church has a lot history about Rømø. We could see the graveyard of people from 17th century. The has a book about the church and the history of it which at the time of this review they sell it 100DKK or 15Euro. Overall is a good place to be visited once.
Alan Campbell (2 years ago)
The church was closed so I cannot comment on the inside. The outside is attractive and the churchyard cemetery is immaculate. Worth a few minutes if you are driving by.
Andreas Thurow (2 years ago)
Historic central church of Rømø. Displaying the splendour of seafaring families of days past
Dirk Smits (4 years ago)
Nice Little church, worth a visit. Take time to read the remembrance boards and visit the commander stoned in thé church yard.
Martina Smrčková (4 years ago)
Church is small. And inside design it so interesting, because place for sitting are everywhere and design is different than usually in european churches.
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