St. Jacob's Church

Lübeck, Germany

St. Jacob's church is easy to recognise from a distance as it has four spherical globes on the tower's helm edge. The three-naved Gothic brick hall church (built in 1334) has been the church of seafarers since the Middle Ages. It was consecrated together with St. Mary's and St. Peter's. Since the church did not suffer any damage during the 2nd World War, the boxed pew and historic organ are still intact. The small 'Stellwagen organ' is one of the best preserved examples of North German organs from the 16th century.

A lifeboat commemorates the sinking of the four-masted barque 'Pamir' in 1957. It is located in the north tower chapel and represents the 'National Memorial for Civilian Shipping' today.

St. Jacob's is a memorial site for international seafarers and placed in its vault beneath the Pamir chapel, which serves as a Columbarium (a place of memory), are the urns of those whose lives were intertwined with the sea. An ensemble of three-storey brick eaves houses built in 1601 stands in front of St. Jacob's. These served as residences for the pastors and preachers of St. Jacob's Church.

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Details

Founded: 1334
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.luebeck-tourism.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andre Baginski (17 months ago)
Mega
Jorge Lopez (17 months ago)
Great historical church
Robin (2 years ago)
Cool
Morten Halling (3 years ago)
Free entre.
chris boots (7 years ago)
One of the most unusual gothic style churches I have ever seen complete with skulls up in the eves, worth a look!
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