St. Jacob's Church

Lübeck, Germany

St. Jacob's church is easy to recognise from a distance as it has four spherical globes on the tower's helm edge. The three-naved Gothic brick hall church (built in 1334) has been the church of seafarers since the Middle Ages. It was consecrated together with St. Mary's and St. Peter's. Since the church did not suffer any damage during the 2nd World War, the boxed pew and historic organ are still intact. The small 'Stellwagen organ' is one of the best preserved examples of North German organs from the 16th century.

A lifeboat commemorates the sinking of the four-masted barque 'Pamir' in 1957. It is located in the north tower chapel and represents the 'National Memorial for Civilian Shipping' today.

St. Jacob's is a memorial site for international seafarers and placed in its vault beneath the Pamir chapel, which serves as a Columbarium (a place of memory), are the urns of those whose lives were intertwined with the sea. An ensemble of three-storey brick eaves houses built in 1601 stands in front of St. Jacob's. These served as residences for the pastors and preachers of St. Jacob's Church.

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Details

Founded: 1334
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.luebeck-tourism.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

phhpro (2 years ago)
stunning vistas. incredible work of art
Vinay Kulkarni (3 years ago)
Nice church. Vintage. Lovely construction. Must see.
Dusty Thuss (5 years ago)
Was too late to go inside. The church looked very nice from the outside though.
Christian Slag (5 years ago)
Magnificent church which is nothing else but stunning. Easily accessible and not at all crowded. (as a bonus I provided a picture of two cute dogs in a stroller, that passed by us in the church.)
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