St. Simeon's and St. Anne's Church

Tallinn, Estonia

The wooden Orthodox church was built in 1752-1755 on the initiative of Russian sailors. St. Simeon's is the second Orthodox church to have sprung up as part of the suburban building boom that followed the Great Northern War.

The building was seriously damaged during the Soviet period, when it was turned into a sports hall. During this time it also lost its bell tower and onion dome. Fortunately the church was restored after Estonia regained independence, and since 2001, an Estonian Orthodox congregation has once again been active here.

Reference: Tallinn Tourism

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Address

Ahtri, Tallinn, Estonia
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Details

Founded: 1752-1755
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

erki oras (3 years ago)
Small and cozy wooden church between the port and the city. Contains a small orthodox shop.
Vytas Neviera (3 years ago)
I've discovered this church during my last trip to Tallinn in mkd-summer. Absolutely beautiful wooden architecture. Even though it's an eastern orthodox church, it's architectural style isn't purely eastern orthodox which makes it special.
TheRin30 (4 years ago)
Церковь Святого Симеона и пророчицы Анны построена по инициативе российских моряков в 1752 - 1755 годах. Церковь построили у самой кромки воды, а фундамент сделан, по преданию, из затонувших кораблей и старого корабельного такелажа. В советское время в церкви был спортивный зал. Сейчас церковь принадлежит эстонской православной церкви.
George On tour (4 years ago)
The church, belonging to Estonian Orthodox Church, was built between 1755 and 1870. This is an "Admiralty church" that is said to have been built by Russian sailors on the wreck of a ship. When Estonian Republic was first established, the sanctuary was handed over to an Estonian congregation. In the Soviet times, this small church by the sea was used as a sports hall; today, it has been restored and is once again used as a church. It has unique woodcut Greek-style iconostasis, pulpit and pews. On the ground floor, you will find a shop selling church paraphernalia and literature. In the tower, there is a church textile museum that is open from Tuesday to Friday from 11 am to 5 pm, on Saturday from noon to 2 pm and on Sunday from noon to 3 pm. Entrance is free.
Петр Зиныч (4 years ago)
Очень старинная деревянная церковь.
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