St. Simeon's and St. Anne's Church

Tallinn, Estonia

The wooden Orthodox church was built in 1752-1755 on the initiative of Russian sailors. St. Simeon's is the second Orthodox church to have sprung up as part of the suburban building boom that followed the Great Northern War.

The building was seriously damaged during the Soviet period, when it was turned into a sports hall. During this time it also lost its bell tower and onion dome. Fortunately the church was restored after Estonia regained independence, and since 2001, an Estonian Orthodox congregation has once again been active here.

Reference: Tallinn Tourism

Comments

Your name



Address

Ahtri, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1752-1755
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

erki oras (2 years ago)
Small and cozy wooden church between the port and the city. Contains a small orthodox shop.
Vytas Neviera (2 years ago)
I've discovered this church during my last trip to Tallinn in mkd-summer. Absolutely beautiful wooden architecture. Even though it's an eastern orthodox church, it's architectural style isn't purely eastern orthodox which makes it special.
TheRin30 (3 years ago)
Церковь Святого Симеона и пророчицы Анны построена по инициативе российских моряков в 1752 - 1755 годах. Церковь построили у самой кромки воды, а фундамент сделан, по преданию, из затонувших кораблей и старого корабельного такелажа. В советское время в церкви был спортивный зал. Сейчас церковь принадлежит эстонской православной церкви.
George On tour (3 years ago)
The church, belonging to Estonian Orthodox Church, was built between 1755 and 1870. This is an "Admiralty church" that is said to have been built by Russian sailors on the wreck of a ship. When Estonian Republic was first established, the sanctuary was handed over to an Estonian congregation. In the Soviet times, this small church by the sea was used as a sports hall; today, it has been restored and is once again used as a church. It has unique woodcut Greek-style iconostasis, pulpit and pews. On the ground floor, you will find a shop selling church paraphernalia and literature. In the tower, there is a church textile museum that is open from Tuesday to Friday from 11 am to 5 pm, on Saturday from noon to 2 pm and on Sunday from noon to 3 pm. Entrance is free.
Петр Зиныч (3 years ago)
Очень старинная деревянная церковь.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Les Invalides

Les Invalides is a complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building"s original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l"Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d"Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France"s war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte.

Louis XIV initiated the project in 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides. The architect of Les Invalides was Libéral Bruant. The enlarged project was completed in 1676, the river front measured 196 metres and the complex had fifteen courtyards. Jules Hardouin Mansart assisted the aged Bruant, and the chapel was finished in 1679 to Bruant"s designs after the elder architect"s death.

Shortly after the veterans" chapel was completed, Louis XIV commissioned Mansart to construct a separate private royal chapel referred to as the Église du Dôme from its most striking feature. Inspired by St. Peter"s Basilica in Rome, the original for all Baroque domes, it is one of the triumphs of French Baroque architecture. The domed chapel is centrally placed to dominate the court of honour. It was finished in 1708.

Because of its location and significance, the Invalides served as the scene for several key events in French history. On 14 July 1789 it was stormed by Parisian rioters who seized the cannons and muskets stored in its cellars to use against the Bastille later the same day. Napoleon was entombed under the dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840. In December 1894 the degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus was held before the main building, while his subsequent rehabilitation ceremony took place in a courtyard of the complex in 1906.

The building retained its primary function of a retirement home and hospital for military veterans until the early twentieth century. In 1872 the musée d"artillerie (Artillery Museum) was located within the building to be joined by the Historical Museum of the Armies in 1896. The two institutions were merged to form the present musée de l"armée in 1905. At the same time the veterans in residence were dispersed to smaller centres outside Paris. The reason was that the adoption of a mainly conscript army, after 1872, meant a substantial reduction in the numbers of veterans having the twenty or more years of military service formerly required to enter the Hôpital des Invalides. The building accordingly became too large for its original purpose. The modern complex does however still include the facilities detailed below for about a hundred elderly or incapacitated former soldiers.