Malla manor traces its history back to 1443, when it is first recorder in written sources. During that time, there was a small castle at the site. Around 1620, the estate became the property of Swedish field marshal Gustav Horn. In 1651-1654, he commissioned architect Zakarias Hoffmann to erect a new manor house on the site. The house burnt down during the Great Northern War, and the current building received its appearance in the 1880's. The estate is now privately owned.

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Details

Founded: 1880s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ergo Pottsepp (12 months ago)
Uue hullult optimistliku soomlase omanduses.
Alari Jüriöö (12 months ago)
Kui keegi mõisa korda teeks, siis oleks väga kena koht
bussemusse (12 months ago)
Hieno paikka ja odottaa remonttia.
Muuk Kivi (17 months ago)
Would be a beautiful mansion, but privately held and in a desparate need for renovation
Вячеслав Ребров (2 years ago)
Все в процессе возрождения
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