Wanda Mound is a tumulus assumed to be the resting place of the legendary princess Wanda. According to one version of the story, she committed suicide by drowning in the Vistula river to avoid unwanted marriage. The mound is located close to the spot on the river bank where her body was found. Archaeological studies, conducted on site in 1913 and in mid-1960, did not provide any conclusive evidence of the mound's age and purpose.

The mound base, some 50 metres in diameter and its height is 14 metres. Unlike the other three mounds in Kraków, this one is not located on a natural hill.

The first written record of the mound comes from the 13th century. Within a mile of the mound-site in 1225 a monastery was built by the bishop of Kraków, Iwo Odrowąż, called the Mogiła Abbey, which is still active today. In 1860 it became a part of Austro-Hungarian fortifications, pulled down only in 1968-1970. In 1890 a monument designed by Jan Matejko was erected at the top.

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User Reviews

James Gutowski (2 years ago)
Difficult to get to. Great views, though. Not worth making an extra trip for.
Denis Martishevsky (2 years ago)
Located far away from city center. Industrial area. Really nothing to see.
Robert Lohkamp (2 years ago)
A good place to test your climbing skills. It's quiet and peaceful, located in the outskirts of Krakow.
Helena Shek-B. (2 years ago)
Little bit remote and in the middle of nothing, but nice to hike if you want to get away from the crowd and feel a littlw bit historical.
Dominik Kusion (2 years ago)
Great place for walking or bike trips.
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