Wanda Mound is a tumulus assumed to be the resting place of the legendary princess Wanda. According to one version of the story, she committed suicide by drowning in the Vistula river to avoid unwanted marriage. The mound is located close to the spot on the river bank where her body was found. Archaeological studies, conducted on site in 1913 and in mid-1960, did not provide any conclusive evidence of the mound's age and purpose.

The mound base, some 50 metres in diameter and its height is 14 metres. Unlike the other three mounds in Kraków, this one is not located on a natural hill.

The first written record of the mound comes from the 13th century. Within a mile of the mound-site in 1225 a monastery was built by the bishop of Kraków, Iwo Odrowąż, called the Mogiła Abbey, which is still active today. In 1860 it became a part of Austro-Hungarian fortifications, pulled down only in 1968-1970. In 1890 a monument designed by Jan Matejko was erected at the top.

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User Reviews

James Gutowski (3 years ago)
Difficult to get to. Great views, though. Not worth making an extra trip for.
Denis Martishevsky (3 years ago)
Located far away from city center. Industrial area. Really nothing to see.
Robert Lohkamp (3 years ago)
A good place to test your climbing skills. It's quiet and peaceful, located in the outskirts of Krakow.
Helena Shek-B. (3 years ago)
Little bit remote and in the middle of nothing, but nice to hike if you want to get away from the crowd and feel a littlw bit historical.
Dominik Kusion (3 years ago)
Great place for walking or bike trips.
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The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.