St. Andrew's Church

Kraków, Poland

The Church of St. Andrew was built between 1079 and 1098 by a medieval Polish statesman Palatine Sieciech. It is a rare surviving example of the European fortress church used for defensive purposes.

Built in Romanesque style, it is one of the oldest buildings in Kraków and one of the best-preserved Romanesque buildings in Poland. It was the only church in Kraków to withstand the Mongol attack of 1241. Along the lower part of the broader section of its façade are small openings that served as defensive windows at a time when the church was a place of refuge from military assaults.

From 1320 it was used by the Religious Order of Poor Clares. The building has been renovated many times. The present Baroque interiors have decorations by Baltazar Fontana, paintings by Karol Dankwart and gilded altars. The Baroque domes atop the octagonal towers were added in 1639.

The massive building was constructed from stone blocks towards the end of the 11th century, and also fulfilled important defensive functions. The two octagonal looking towers, with the doubled arcade windows are perfect examples and characteristic of Romanesque architecture. They extend high over the body of the church. The apse decorated with a modest arcade freeze and numerous details (including stairs and window frames) maintain the same character.

The structure was probably expanded, extended and strengthened up until the mid-12th century. The church successfully withstood the Tatar-Mongol raid of 1241, providing shelter for the majority of residents and inhabitants of the city. At that time, it was – quite rightly – called “the lower castle” to be distinguished from the nearby “upper” standing on top of the Wawel Hill. It was also sometimes referred to as the second church of Kraków after the Wawel Cathedral. In 1320, the church was entrusted to the Order of Poor Clares, whose convent was built south of the church. Also the brick, Gothic oratorio that today plays the role of the sacristy dates back to that period.

The baroque decoration of the interior, with rich stucco decoration by Italian painter and architect Baldassare 'Baltazar' Fontana, comes from the refurbishment that took place after 1700, while the construction of the high altar, attributed to Francesco Placidi was initiated in the upcoming years. Attention is drawn to the pulpit in the shape of a boat, and the musical choir with 18th-century organ in the chancel, decorated in the rococo manner. The baroque steeples added in 1639 contrast with the severity of the Romanesque form of the church.

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Address

Grodzka 54, Kraków, Poland
See all sites in Kraków

Details

Founded: 1079-1098
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julio De La Morena (2 years ago)
being the oldest church in Cracow it deserves a visit
Denisa Ungureanu (Jiinxii) (2 years ago)
I walked past it on the way to the castle. Pretty.
Илья Валихов (2 years ago)
Very beautiful temple
Oliwia Biros (3 years ago)
Fantastically preserved romanesque Church built between in the 11th century. It a fortress Church that was used for defensive purposes in the olden days. #letsguide, #cracow, #krakow, #visitkrakow, #visitcracow, #oldtown, #poland, #royalroute, #grodzka, #church, #kościół
Marc Albert (4 years ago)
This is one of Krakow's oldest churches. It's actually part of a monastery, which doesn't seem to be open to the public. When we went the church was open but we could only stand in the back and had a limited view. It seems very pretty. I'm not sure if/when you can actually visit. It's very pretty inside and, since you're probably visiting Peter and Paul next door, you should definitely stop in and take a look.
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