Roznów Castle Ruins

Rożnów, Poland

The Rożnów Castle is a complex of defensive objects, consisting of a medieval “upper castle” and Renaissance fortifications (“lower castle”). Its history dates back to the 13th century, when the Gryfita family built here a watchtower. The castle itself was probably built in 1350–1370 by Piotr Rozen. It is in the shape of a rectangle, 44 meters by 20 meters. In 1426, the castle was purchased by one of the most famous Polish knights, Zawisza Czarny, and after his death, it remained in the hands of Zawisza’s sons. In the late 15th century, Rożnów belonged to the Wydźga family, and later, to the Tarnowski family.

In the first half of the 16th century, during the Polish Golden Age, Hetman Jan Tarnowski began the construction of a fortress at Rożnów. It was planned to become one of the strongest and most modern fortresses in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, guarding southern border of the nation against the Ottoman Empire, which, after the Battle of Mohacs emerged as the dominant state in Southeastern Europe. Tarnowski’s death in 1561 put an end to these plans, and the construction was never completed.

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Rożnów, Poland
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

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en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

anna afek (7 months ago)
A picturesque place, full of history with magnificent views of the Rożnowskie lake in the distance. The place is slightly neglected, however, still very charming. It's not very easy to access and you need to be cautious when visiting. If you're travelling by car, you can stop at the parking lot of a church nearby (approx 300 m away) and then travel in foot.
agngawlik (7 months ago)
Beautiful views, it is a pity that it is terribly neglected and not even protected against further destruction ..
Asia Asia (8 months ago)
Ruins, neglected in themselves, fragments of walls and rubble. However, it is worth seeing, even for the atmosphere and the beautiful view of Lake Rożnowskie and the historical owner.
Eva Sovová (8 months ago)
It is a castle ruin, which is partly fenced and, for an incomprehensible reason, also improvised, partly roofed. It is located directly on the asphalt road and the official footpath leads to it from one side only. From one place there is also a little view of the lake through mature trees. Official parking at the ruins is not possible, but you can stop here, although a better option is to stop in the parking lot nearby.
Marcin Marcin (8 months ago)
The ruins themselves attract attention but apart from the nini and a pile of rubble and stones, there is nothing interesting to see during the day. It is said that it is worth seeing the sunset from this place.
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