Malchow Abbey is a former Cistercian nunnery founded in 1298, when the nuns from Röbel settled in Alt-Malchow and took over the premises of the former Magdalene community here. Nicholas II, Prince of Werle, gave the new nunnery the patronage of the churches at Alt-Malchow, Neu-Malchow and Lexow. After the Reformation the abbey was a collegiate foundation for noblewomen from 1572 to 1923.

The former abbey building complex is now dominated by the church, which was built between 1844 and 1849 to plans by Friedrich Wilhelm Buttel. These included a 52-metre high brick tower, after the addition of which it was thought necessary to refurbish the nave for aesthetic reasons. Before 1844 the church was a simple stone building.

After a fire in 1888 the church was rebuilt in a Gothic Revival between 1888 and 1890 according to plans by Georg Daniel.

Of the old abbey buildings there still exist the cloister, as well as some ancillary buildings now used for residential purposes.

In the abbey church and the nearby organ courtyard is a permanent exhibition relating to the history of organ-building in Mecklenburg. The Mecklenburg Organ Museum is the first of its sort in the new Bundesländer. In the abbey church itself there is an organ by Friedrich Friese III.

The abbey complex also includes the Engelsche Garten, laid out by, and named after, Johann Jacob Christian Engel (1762–1840), master of the abbey kitchen from 1786 to 1818. It was not completed until 1855/56.

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Address

Kloster 31, Malchow, Germany
See all sites in Malchow

Details

Founded: 1298
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Epic Warior (3 years ago)
Entrance fee too high over half the construction site you can only look inside the Orgelmuseeum. I think you should write in what is accessible. For me it was now unfortunately nothing .. a shame
Lina Kabowski (3 years ago)
Very nice monastery church. The best way to relax after the tour of discovery is in the in-house café. Here you can find the best cakes in the region, of course homemade.
Joe Win (3 years ago)
Worth seeing, old ... there is a cafe ... Malchow is a nice little place ...
Andreas Schild (3 years ago)
It's a shame that so little is made of the great location. The exhibition of the artist Voss is worth seeing.
Udo W (4 years ago)
Ein schöner Ort zum verweilen. Das Kloster ist sehenswert.
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