Klempenow Castle

Klempenow, Germany

Klempenow Castle was built during the time of German settlement in Pomerania in the 13th century and formed part of a series of fortifications on the border with Mecklenburg. The original castle consisted of two towers and a three metre thick defensive wall. It has been substantially altered during the centuries.

During the 17th century it acquired more or less the present shape and look. When Pomerania was ruled by Sweden, the castle was given as a fief to Dodo zu Innhausen und Knyphausen by the Swedish king. From 1762, it belonged to the Swedish Crown. It has since housed several different residents; after World War II, it housed refugees expelled from former German lands and at one time as many as fourteen families lived in the castle. After 1990, a renovation of the castle was carried out.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ira Behrendt (4 years ago)
Sollten Sie unbedingt besuchen... APFELMARKT... WEIHNACHTSMARKT super... aber auch für einen Kaffee mit einem leckeren Kuchen...
Michael Volksdorf (4 years ago)
Super schön. Für die Saison sind alle noch bei Regen gut gelaunt. Ein Ausflugsziel für alle
Victoria Winters (4 years ago)
Very friendly staff and though it doesn't look as exciting from outside, you are allowed to explore any door that is unlocked. I had a lot of fun and it's a great activity for a free afternoon
Kilian Hüttner (4 years ago)
Tolle Location
Peter Abadir (5 years ago)
An unbelievable beautiful piece of art, a castle in the middle of no where in eastern most part of Germany, was originally built in 1500-1600 time frame. A picturesque place perfect for wedding pictures . An added bonus is an art gallery across from the castle.
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