Viimsi Manor, which was established by St. Brigitta Nunnery of Pirita, was first mentioned in 1471 as Wiems. After the Great Northern War the manor had multiple owners, among those the Stenbock, Buxhoeveden, Maydell and Schottländer families.

The one-storey stone-made house got its present shape after the fire of 1865. After the dispossession in 1919 the manor was gifted to the Commander-in-chief of the Estonian Army General Johan Laidoner who owned it until 1940. During the World War II it was used by the Red Army. Since 2001 the building houses the National War Museum of Estonia (also the Museum of General Laidoner).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Nelgi tee, Viimsi, Estonia
See all sites in Viimsi

Details

Founded: 1865
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jevgeni Dudakov (19 months ago)
Небольшой уютный зал с камином, вкусная еда, внимательный персонал.
Lisa Moore (2 years ago)
Nice room. Quiet place. Great location. Roo too warm. Staff helpful. No sauna access despite being advertised.
jari antikainen (3 years ago)
It was all right. Not the best one but not so bad also. Basic.
Alexey Larkov (3 years ago)
Inconvenient beds, no fridge, dirty bathroom, mosquitos
Liisu L (3 years ago)
Old, not too much air in room.bathroom really nice.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.