Viimsi Manor, which was established by St. Brigitta Nunnery of Pirita, was first mentioned in 1471 as Wiems. After the Great Northern War the manor had multiple owners, among those the Stenbock, Buxhoeveden, Maydell and Schottländer families.

The one-storey stone-made house got its present shape after the fire of 1865. After the dispossession in 1919 the manor was gifted to the Commander-in-chief of the Estonian Army General Johan Laidoner who owned it until 1940. During the World War II it was used by the Red Army. Since 2001 the building houses the National War Museum of Estonia (also the Museum of General Laidoner).

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Nelgi tee, Viimsi, Estonia
See all sites in Viimsi

Details

Founded: 1865
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marek Golaszewski (12 months ago)
Nice and clean rooms, in silent district
Julie-Anne S.Roy (2 years ago)
Very disappointed. They gave us a much smaller room than the one we booked and paid for. They offered free coffee and cake as a compensation for the next morning and nobody was there. The kitchen was closed at 9am. Overall very bad experience. The worst hotel in Tallinn!.
Teemu (2 years ago)
Bed was squeeking so loud, and bedsheet wouldn't stay on. No air conditioning.
Jevgeni Dudakov (2 years ago)
Небольшой уютный зал с камином, вкусная еда, внимательный персонал.
Lisa Moore (3 years ago)
Nice room. Quiet place. Great location. Roo too warm. Staff helpful. No sauna access despite being advertised.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.