Zwingenberg Castle

Zwingenberg, Germany

Zwingenberg Castle dates from the 13th century. In the 1326 the lords of Zwingenberg were mentioned as an owner. In 1364 the castle was conquered and destroyed by the imperial forces. The fortress and estate were then immediately divided in two equal parts and bought by the Palatinate and the archbishoprie of Mainz. The reconstruction of the castle was made by the brothers Hans and Eberhard of Hirschhorn in 1404. The brothers were invested with the castle by Mainz and the Palatinate. We owe the building as it appears today essentially to them.

In 1778 Karl Theodor of the Palatinate conferred it upon his natural son the count of Bretzenheim; the count’s mother the countess of Heydeck, was buried in the castle chapel, where her tomb still stands today.

in 1808 the palatinate was divided up upon Napoleons orders the new sovereign the Grand Duke Karl Friedrich of Baden purchased it with his own private means. Since then it has been family property of the house of Baden.

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Details

Founded: 1404
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wieghart Greff (11 months ago)
Wir waren hier für die open Air Veranstaltung "The Rocky Horror Show". Eine wunderbare Veranstaltung die perfekt zu dem Ambiente passt. Sofort wieder!
明慧玲 (16 months ago)
美麗的城堡聽說是屬於前城堡主人後代所有,因維修成本高目前大多城堡都已屬國家管理。 這裡每年暑期都會舉辦歌舞秀,今年特別前往觀賞,在酷暑中清涼幽默的歌舞秀贏得所有觀眾的喝彩!
Douglas Bryant (17 months ago)
It is Worth visiting
Nutim Z (20 months ago)
Private Castle
Laurentiu Vilcu (4 years ago)
Very nice castle.
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