Wimpfen Imperial Palace

Bad Wimpfen, Germany

The largest fortified Stauffer palace north of the Alps was built at the end of the 12th century by the Staufer emperors, which included Frederick I (Barbarossa) in Bad Wimpfen. Even from a far one is impressed by the striking silhouette with the two keeps, named the Red and the Blue Tower, the palace chapel, the arcades of the Stauffer palace and the stone house. Stauffer ladies in historical costumes give guided tours of the imperial palace every Sunday at 2 pm.

The Blue Tower was built about 1200 and served as the high watch tower well into the 19th century. The tower watchmen were hired particularly to look out for fire. The tower watchman tradition – probably the oldest in Germany - has continued for centuries up until today. From 32 meters above one can enjoy a splendid view of the Neckar River valley and the Old Town, which is a listed site, or listen to the tower trumpets on Sundays at 12 am during the season.

The Red tower was also built around 1200. This would have been the last refuge of the lord of the castle it was elaborately equipped (Romanesque fireplace, sanitary fittings). Nearby is the Nürnberger Türmchen, a small tower serving as a reminder of the help renderd by the Free Imperial City of Nürnberg after the Thirty Years` War.

The Steinhaus was the largest residential building in the palace, built after 1217. Probably originally the women´s apartments in the Staufen palace, it is the largest Romanesque dwelling in Germany. Late Gothic stepped gable and seven-sectional window. On the first floor there are valuable medieval and Late Gothic mural paintings. The building now houses the Bad Wimpfen Municipal Museum of History (devoted mainly to prehistory, early history, the Staufen medieval period and the art of stonemasonry).

The Staufen Imperial Palace Chapel (ca. 1160) was dedicated to St. Nicholas with imperial gallery at the entrance from the palace hall. Converted in 1837 into a farmhouse with a barn and stables, the building was restored to its original state after 1908. Today it houses the Bad Wimpfen Municipal Museum of Ecclesiastical History with exhibits from the treasure vaults of the town`s monasteries and churches.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.burgenstrasse.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Renganathan Ellappan (2 years ago)
Good views
The Brackins (3 years ago)
A walk back in time!
Tobias Schirmer (3 years ago)
Great view!
rusache stere (4 years ago)
Super
Nabeel ur Rehman (4 years ago)
Schön It has beautiful view of the town. Must to see in town.
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