Herrenberg Church

Herrenberg, Germany

The Collegiate Church (Stiftskirche) towers over the town of Herrenberg, dominating the cityscape. It was built in two main phases of construction (1276-1293 and 1471-1493) and was the first Gothic hall church to be completed in Württemberg. In 1749 the two Gothic towers were demolished and replaced by the Baroque onion dome.

Among the church's outstanding features are the baptismal font from 1472, the stone pulpit from 1504 by Master Hanselmann and the choirstalls from the year 1517 with carvings by Heinrich Schickhardt, the grandfather of the famous architect. The high altar dating from 1519, with paintings by Jerg Ratgeb, is now to be found in the State Gallery in Stuttgart. The Stiftskirche is home to the Herrenberg Bell Museum – and it also boasts the oldest rose window in Swabia.

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Details

Founded: 1276-1493
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stuttgart-tourist.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Breanna Chromey (2 years ago)
Such a gorgeous church, and the view is incredible as well!
Roy Cook (2 years ago)
Amazing building which you can go into AND it is heated. I'm not sure just how green it is to heat a huge stone built church? Must be very costly too!
Algo Trendy (2 years ago)
A place of quite rest. You can sit here and have prayer, there are fewer people.
Thomas Lentz (Tommy) (3 years ago)
Nice church which is worth visiting. And while you are there, take a walk up the Schlossberg
Klaus L. (3 years ago)
Eine wunderbar schlichte Kirche mit einem schönen Glockenmuseum. Es lohnt sich unbedingt mal vorbei zu schauen um ein bisschen Auszeit zu nehmen von der Hektik des Alltag und mit etwas Glück kann man dem Organisten beim spielen zuhören.
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