Herrenberg Church

Herrenberg, Germany

The Collegiate Church (Stiftskirche) towers over the town of Herrenberg, dominating the cityscape. It was built in two main phases of construction (1276-1293 and 1471-1493) and was the first Gothic hall church to be completed in Württemberg. In 1749 the two Gothic towers were demolished and replaced by the Baroque onion dome.

Among the church's outstanding features are the baptismal font from 1472, the stone pulpit from 1504 by Master Hanselmann and the choirstalls from the year 1517 with carvings by Heinrich Schickhardt, the grandfather of the famous architect. The high altar dating from 1519, with paintings by Jerg Ratgeb, is now to be found in the State Gallery in Stuttgart. The Stiftskirche is home to the Herrenberg Bell Museum – and it also boasts the oldest rose window in Swabia.

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Details

Founded: 1276-1493
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stuttgart-tourist.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klaus L. (2 years ago)
Eine wunderbar schlichte Kirche mit einem schönen Glockenmuseum. Es lohnt sich unbedingt mal vorbei zu schauen um ein bisschen Auszeit zu nehmen von der Hektik des Alltag und mit etwas Glück kann man dem Organisten beim spielen zuhören.
Sunshine's Bright (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne Kirche. Wahrzeichen der Stadt Herrenberg. Interessante kirchenmusikalische Angebote. Guter Blick auf Herrenberg, welches man vom Schönbuch Turm aus nicht sehen kann, wohl aber die angrenzenden Gemeinden. Der Aufstieg auf den Kirchturm belohnt mit einem tollen Blick.
Brunetta Rizzi (3 years ago)
Un paese che sembra uscito da una favola di Andersen! E come tante casette anche la chiesa é molto particolare! Non una colonna che sia dritta !!ma gli abitanti non si preoccupano....ci hanno detto che la Chiesa si piega di un solo millimetro all'anno
Luisa Gomez (5 years ago)
Parking is not possible, more of a place that you have to walk to from wherever you found parking in the city. You'll find a old church with a breath taking view of the town and there is music played early in the morning (about 8:30) for about 15 min on the weekend. There is also a small outdoor art collection up the mountain behind the church. Perfect for a gorgeous spring day. Kids and pets welcome on the small hike up the mountain!
Andrew Thomson (7 years ago)
Big old church that has a walkway around the bell tower. Worth a visit just for the view.
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