The Manor of Saku village was originally founded in the Middle Ages, first record date back to the year 1513. The manor house itself was constructed in 1820 and it is among the best examples of classicistic architecture in Estonia. It is believed that the building was designed by Carlo Rossi - one of the most famous architects of the period.

The renewed Saku Manor was opened in 2002 as a recreational and conference centre. There is a ballroom for up to 100 people, a seminar and a cognac room, accommodation for up to 39 persons.

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Founded: 1820
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Noel Sinikallas (2 years ago)
A lovely museum with an excellent restaurant!
Shipbl (3 years ago)
Very nice!
Margit Haabsaar (3 years ago)
Saku Manor with its outstanding architecture is splended. It is so impressing that it was probably projected by a foreign architect from St Petersburg. It might have been for example Carlo Rossi. Its cool classic architectural language is sober but it was built with the money gained by producing beer.
Shlomo Kandel (4 years ago)
Very nice an beautiful place, great food and atmosphere.
Gnaw Furry Beans (4 years ago)
Well preserved old manor indeed but there's so much more they could do. We ate a light dinner consisting of starters only and that was great; breakfast was underwhelming, with bad coffee and all the warm dishes, oatmeal included, swimming in butter. Stuck with the uncooked things, you can't botch up muesli, yoghurt and apple juice. Room was ok but no air conditioning makes life uncomfortable this summer. You can't help avoiding a comparison to some other manors that are run by the original family. It's feeling like just another hotel albeit in a fancy setting. The beer museum next door has a nice pub, not to be missed.
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