Schloss Solitude

Stuttgart, Germany

Schloss Solitude was built as a hunting lodge between 1764 and 1769 under Duke Karl Eugen of Württemberg. Schloss Solitude was originally designed to act as a refugium, a place of quiet, reflection and solitude (thus the name). Construction of the castle was plagued by political and financial difficulties. Karl Eugen had taken Württemberg into the Seven Years' War on the losing side against Prussia. The building exceeded the budget allocated by the duchy of Württemberg. Further, political wrangling between the duke and influential Stuttgart land barons led to the duke moving temporarily from Stuttgart to Ludwigsburg. In the long run, the castle was prohibitively expensive to keep just as a temporary residence. In 1770 it housed a high school founded by Duke Eugen. In 1775, the Karlsschule academy moved to Castle Solitude. It served as an academy of arts, a military academy, and later a general university for children of the elite. Eventually, maintenance costs led to its closure as a school after the Duke's death late in the 18th century. Between 1972 and 1983, the Federal Republic of Germany restored the castle.

Since 1990, the annexed buildings (Officen-building and Kavaliers-building) have housed the Akademie Schloss Solitude. The Kavaliers building incorporates living quarters for students.

Castle Solitude was designed by a working group at the ducal court under the guidance of Philippe de La Guêpière with active input from Duke Karl Eugen and master craftsmen. Its exterior is typical Rococo. On the inside, however, the style is characteristic of classicism: instead of the irregular lively forms typical of Rococo, the proportions of the rooms and wall are typically classical in design.

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Details

Founded: 1764-1769
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matt Burnett (20 months ago)
A nice baroque style castle with a great view. It's especially good to visit when the weather is nice.
Roger Raemaekers (20 months ago)
I only visited the premises and that looks quite nice. Irma not s big castle but very well maintained. During wintertime is less appealing but still you see the beauty and wealth that must have been here in the original years. Good place to go for a walk. Next time, when the weather is good I'll do a long walk.
lea joh (20 months ago)
Really pretty hunting castle. It was pretty muddy on the grass area so make sure to have the right shoes for it. The tours are only in German.
Jon-Paul deLange (2 years ago)
Aptly named estate located within Metropolitan Stuttgart, but you’d never know it. This is the perfect place to come and unwind, where there’s plenty of space for walks in solitude, meadows, woods and beautiful architecture to admire. It’s a perfect place for a picnic, meditation, or just to be.
nitesh bhandarkar (2 years ago)
Very nice place. Perfect justification to the name Solitude. Peaceful surrounding. Can have a top view of Stuttgart.. Don't miss this place if you happen to be in Stuttgart. Preferable time evening..
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