Bobbin Church

Glowe, Germany

Nothing remains of the preceding structure of Bobbin Church (mentioned in 1250, originally owned by the Bergen monastery). The present church is an imposing, fieldstone structure with shaped brick elements plastered so as to leave the underlying surface visible. Brick is used for the corners of the building, gables, buttresses, vaults, and all ornamentation. The nave, choir, and sacristy were built in about 1400. It has a rectangular nave with a flat wooden ceiling, and a retracted, rib-vaulted choir. The two square choir bays have been repeated in enlarged form in the nave. The interior is whitewashed and in 1955 was painted in simple form. Floors are of limestone tiles. The choir is a step higher than the nave. The windows were enlarged, probably in the Middle Ages. The “Likhus” on the south side of the choir was built in the 17th century, and was extended in the 17th century to provide access to the patron’s box. The west tower was built in about 1500 of brick with a sprinkling of fieldstone (the upper part still later). Steep pavilion roof with a weathervane from 1657.

Oldest furnishings and accessories: Gotland limestone font from about 1300 (presumably from the preceding church). Cuppa wall decorated with twelve blind ogee-arches. Worth noting: the iron-grilled aumbry inserted in the south wall of the sacristy (from about 1400), decorated with Gothic tempera painting and carving, beside the altar sacrament house with iron-studded wooden door under a canopy and quatrefoil. Other furnishings: pulpit from 1622 (late Renaissance), high altar with choir screen (1668) and patron's box, confessional from 1775 (workshop of Michael Müller, Stralsund), portraits, sepulchral slabs. The churchyard is worth a visit.

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Address

Oberdorf 8, Glowe, Germany
See all sites in Glowe

Details

Founded: c. 1400
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eurob.org

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Gerber (13 months ago)
Small beautiful pilgrimage church
Klaus Paier (2 years ago)
Experience history
Olsen Newman (2 years ago)
Very interesting brick / field stone construction with charm and charisma. Invites you to linger and pause.
Jan Randáček (2 years ago)
Wonderful, romantic place! Although the church interior is normally inaccessible, it is worthwhile to stop because of the church's architecture. Free parking is just outside the church.
Kathrin Lange (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, the second oldest church on the island of Rügen, field stone, around 1400, baptismal font around 1300. The church is often photographed, would be nice if any of the photos makes a donation for the preservation of the church there.
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