Palamuse Church

Palamuse, Estonia

The church of St. Bartholomew in Palamuse is one of the oldest medieval churches in southern Estonia. The three-nave church was probably completed in 1234. It was damaged heavily during Livonian Wars, but rebuilt in Baroque-style. Two medieval tombstones, baroque reredos and pulpit with several carvings (1696) are survived and visible in the church.

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Details

Founded: 1234
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

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User Reviews

Kalle Hein (3 years ago)
Juri Konovalov (3 years ago)
Marko B (3 years ago)
Ilus kirik.
Ilja Tihhanovski (4 years ago)
Great concerts sometimes
Anatoly Ko (9 years ago)
Palamuse alevik, Palamuse koguduse, Jõgevamaa, 58.683752, 26.583324 ‎ 58° 41' 1.51", 26° 34' 59.97" Церковь, школа и пасторат – настоящие легендарные здания из серии повестей Оскара Лутса о деревне Паунвере и её жителях. Эта церковь является одной из старейших средневековых церквей северной части уезда Тартума. Разрушенные в 17 веке своды, были восстановлены лишь в 1929ом году архитектором Эрнстом Кюхнером. В церкви мы можем обнаружить алтарную стену в стиле барокко и кафедру (1696), а также средневековые надгробные плиты и оконные витражи (2001).
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