Urach Residential Palace

Bad Urach, Germany

The palace complex in Urach was built in the early 15th century as the home of Count Ludwig I von Württemberg, at a time when the county was divided. After reunification of Württemberg in 1482, the palace became a well-frequented residence and hunting lodge for the Dukes of Württemberg. Duke Carl Eugen (1728 – 1793) enjoyed staying in Urach, where he would host grand hunting expeditions.

The interiors of the palace bear witness to the preferences and pastimes of its residents, for example the Dürnitz (a type of large hall), the Palmensaal (hall of palms) and, in particular, the unique Goldener Saal. This is the only preserved Renaissance hall built for the Duchy of Württemberg, and one of Germany’s most spectacular Renaissance ballrooms. The Golden Hall was designed for the opulent wedding celebrations of Duke Eberhard im Bart to Italian princess Barbara Gonzaga of Mantua in 1474. It was lavishly decorated in the 17th century. Three Corinthian capitals support the flat ceiling. The room is flooded with natural light on three sides. Its walls and pillars are extensively gilded in gold.

An extraordinary highlight of the palace is the exhibition of sledges belonging to the Württemberg State Museum. Featuring 22 ornate Baroque sledges from the 17 th to 19 th centuries, it is the largest collection of its kind in the world. The sledges of the Dukes of Württemberg illustrate their need for public shows of grandeur and document the changing taste of the court.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.schloss-urach.de

Rating

3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Harrer (2 years ago)
Tim Harrer (2 years ago)
Xethcos Schwarz (3 years ago)
Once and never again.
Xethcos Schwarz (3 years ago)
Once and never again.
Overlord 99 (6 years ago)
Tolles Lokal. Absolut preiswert außerdem kann man sehr schön draußen über die erms sitzen :)
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