Augustusburg Palace

Brühl, Germany

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.

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Address

Promenade, Brühl, Germany
See all sites in Brühl

Details

Founded: 1725-1768
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erin Woodell (20 months ago)
Pretty castle grounds, there is no cafe during the winter, but when the coffee cart is out is very good and has good cake too
JoJo The YuMan (20 months ago)
Very good audiotour which take about an hour. Price is 14€ pp for both the tour and the hunters castle. Perfect spot to have a sunday's walk. The garden is beautiful, specially in the summer.
Ivani Araujo do Nascimento (20 months ago)
The castle has lovely surrounds a garden. I think that it worth a visit during spring and summer when the fountains are on. The castle is nice, good to see barroco art dated from XVII/XVIII century. They run a guided tour (in German) and offer an audio guide for non German speakers. It's not allowed to take photos inside the castle as well as backpacks/luggage, but they offer a storage for your belongings during your visit. You need put 2 or 1 Euro coin in the storage, that will be given back to you when you finish the tour.
Kristin Kachmar (2 years ago)
Very ornate and spectacular. Or only disappointment was that we couldn't take pictures. Tour lasted about an hour and our guide spoke English (only because we were the only people in the tour). Very interesting place.
ellena ellena (2 years ago)
A very beautiful castle. The inside of the castle is one of the best I've seen. And also the court is stunning. The inside tour could be only guided and is in German, but you can take audio guide on English to go along.
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