Romano-Germanic Museum

Cologne, Germany

The Roman-Germanic Museum (Römisch-Germanisches Museum) has a large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum protects the original site of a Roman town villa, from which a large Dionysus mosaic remains in its original place in the basement, and the related Roman Road just outside. In this respect the museum is an archaeological site.

The Römisch-Germanisches Museum is near the Cologne Cathedral on the site of a 3rd-century villa. The villa was discovered in 1941 during the construction of an air-raid shelter. On the floor of the main room of the villa is the renowned Dionysus mosaic. Since the mosaic could not be moved easily, the architects Klaus Renner and Heinz Röcke designed the museum around the mosaic. The inner courtyards of the museum mimic the layout of the ancient villa.

In addition to the Dionysus mosaic, which dates from around A.D. 220/230, there is the reconstructed sepulcher of legionary Poblicius (about A.D. 40). There is also an extensive collection of Roman glassware as well as an array of Roman and medieval jewellery. Many artifacts of everyday life in Roman Cologne are displayed, ncluding portraits (e.g., of Roman emperor Augustus and his wife Livia Drusilla), inscriptions, pottery, and architectural fragments.

The museum has the world's largest collection of locally produced glass from the Roman period.

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Details

Founded: 1974
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kieran Choquet (12 months ago)
I could only see the roman floor mosaic and the reconstituted monument in memory of a roman man. That was very nice, and the guide spoke a good english so it was cool. The two things are very impressive, by the way.
Monika van Hoeve (12 months ago)
Closed! For maybe years! Big renovations. Fortunately, on set times you can visit for only 3 euros the museum's two highlights. A wellspoken guide will explain Roman life in 20 min. You can not miss this gem.
r kennedy (14 months ago)
I was somewhat unimpressed by this museum, but to be fair, I lived in Tunisia for a couple of years, and there were lots of places there that had more impressive collections of Roman artifacts, and most of those places were free to enter. The high point of this museum is some of the small bronze castings, which are very nice. It's a fairly small museum, so the admission fee seemed relatively steep.
Jan Thomas (2 years ago)
Nice Museum of Roman and Germanic history right next to the Cologne dome. A huge amount of ancient findings are exhibited. Almost too much to go digest everything properly.
Dick Nicholson (2 years ago)
This is a great Museum, in the truest sense of the word. Incredible collection of Roman relics, reconstructions, maps etc. Also much older stuff from Germanic tribes and earlier inhabitants. A full day would not be enough to see everything. This museum is worth a trip to Cologne just to see it, but no trip to this city would be complete without a visit to one of the beer halls. Go to the tourist office, get a map, and explore.
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