Romano-Germanic Museum

Cologne, Germany

The Roman-Germanic Museum (Römisch-Germanisches Museum) has a large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum protects the original site of a Roman town villa, from which a large Dionysus mosaic remains in its original place in the basement, and the related Roman Road just outside. In this respect the museum is an archaeological site.

The Römisch-Germanisches Museum is near the Cologne Cathedral on the site of a 3rd-century villa. The villa was discovered in 1941 during the construction of an air-raid shelter. On the floor of the main room of the villa is the renowned Dionysus mosaic. Since the mosaic could not be moved easily, the architects Klaus Renner and Heinz Röcke designed the museum around the mosaic. The inner courtyards of the museum mimic the layout of the ancient villa.

In addition to the Dionysus mosaic, which dates from around A.D. 220/230, there is the reconstructed sepulcher of legionary Poblicius (about A.D. 40). There is also an extensive collection of Roman glassware as well as an array of Roman and medieval jewellery. Many artifacts of everyday life in Roman Cologne are displayed, ncluding portraits (e.g., of Roman emperor Augustus and his wife Livia Drusilla), inscriptions, pottery, and architectural fragments.

The museum has the world's largest collection of locally produced glass from the Roman period.

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Details

Founded: 1974
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kieran (7 months ago)
Very interesting place. I spent half a day wandering around in here and could have easily spent longer. Lots to see.
Teddy Kasteel (10 months ago)
I loved the exhibitions, as well as the building itself. I suggest taking your time for everything, as there is a lot to see.
Mahdi Akhlaghi (16 months ago)
The Dionysus-mosaic is really unique. Focus is heavily on inscriptions and glassworks. The museum is going to be closed for some years due to extensive renovation. The Dionysus-mosaic is really unique. Focus is heavily on inscriptions and glassworks. The museum is going to be closed for some years due to extensive renovation.
Mahdi Akhlaghi (M.A) (16 months ago)
The Dionysus-mosaic is really unique. Focus is heavily on inscriptions and glassworks. The museum is going to be closed for some years due to extensive renovation. The Dionysus-mosaic is really unique. Focus is heavily on inscriptions and glassworks. The museum is going to be closed for some years due to extensive renovation.
Craig Farrow (2 years ago)
So much Roman history, so well conserved! Transportation, ceramics, local artifacts. A great collection of lamps. A extensive store. Near the train station and cathedral. Also near a famous WW2 battlefield. Be prepared to spend hours! Well worth the visit!
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