St. Andrew's Church

Cologne, Germany

St. Andrew's is a 10th-century Romanesque church located in the old town of Cologne. It is one of twelve churches built in Cologne in that period. Archbishop Gero consecrated the church in 974, dedicating it to St. Andrew, although an earlier church at the site was dedicated to St. Matthew. In the 12th century, the church was rebuilt in the Romanesque style, and was probably completed after the great fire of Cologne in 1220.

In the crypt of the church lies a Roman sarcophagus from the 3rd century, which holds the remains of the 13th-century theologian and natural philosopher St. Albertus Magnus. Since 1947, the Dominican Order has ministered to the church.

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Details

Founded: 974 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zafer Yavuz Karakuzulu (2 years ago)
Just follow the secret symbols..
Shay Grob (4 years ago)
Cosy local experience
Eichenwald Matthäus (4 years ago)
Cosy local experience
David Smith (4 years ago)
One of Cologne's 12 Romanesque churches, dating back to the 10th century. Very near the Cathedral. Impressive stained glass windows. Attractive and quiet. Hauptbahnhof U-bahn station.
Eugen Safin (4 years ago)
Fantastic church with an amazing crypt.
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