St. Andrew's Church

Cologne, Germany

St. Andrew's is a 10th-century Romanesque church located in the old town of Cologne. It is one of twelve churches built in Cologne in that period. Archbishop Gero consecrated the church in 974, dedicating it to St. Andrew, although an earlier church at the site was dedicated to St. Matthew. In the 12th century, the church was rebuilt in the Romanesque style, and was probably completed after the great fire of Cologne in 1220.

In the crypt of the church lies a Roman sarcophagus from the 3rd century, which holds the remains of the 13th-century theologian and natural philosopher St. Albertus Magnus. Since 1947, the Dominican Order has ministered to the church.

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Details

Founded: 974 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gloria Frost (10 months ago)
You can visit the tomb of St. Albert the Great, patron saint of scientists and teacher of Thomas Aquinas, in the crypt (basement) of this Church.
Arefin Bashar Arif (2 years ago)
Great somehow
Mark Bezemer (2 years ago)
Big, looks better from the inside. Restoration going on which ruins outside pictures.
Frijo Francis (2 years ago)
Nice looking church
Ben Ben (3 years ago)
Magnificent peace of building
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