Wallraf-Richartz-Museum

Cologne, Germany

Wallraf-Richartz-Museum houses the most extensive collection of medieval Cologne paintings, apart from the Old Pinakothek in Munich, as well as precious works from the time around 1500. Flemish and Dutch masters of the 16th to the 18th century, Rembrandt and Rubens included, are also represented as is a collection of German and French paintings from the beginnings of the modern era until 1900.

The foundations for the museum were laid by Main Attractions 28 the collector Ferdinand Franz Wallraf. The first museum building was constructed in the mid-19th century by the Cologne merchant Johann Heinrich Richartz.

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Details

Founded: 19th century
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Staci Monroe (10 months ago)
Wonderful selection, I only had 1 1/2 hours to look around, would like to return when I have more time to read everything. Recommend this place if you enjoy art and history.
Kristina Maskarin (11 months ago)
Once upon a time in America was great show, permanent collection also very interesting with some rare pearls. Highly recommended
D MacLean (11 months ago)
We saw the exhibit on American art. Really good with lots of famous paintings. Really had no time to see the rest of the museum. Would like to go back again and see the works by Rembrandt, Monet, etc. One could spend many hours there to take it all in. A bit expensive.
Michał Malanowski (11 months ago)
Beautifull place. The art collection is fantastic. Mandatory visit for anyone loving art, while in Cologne.
Mick Pelling (2 years ago)
Excellent art gallery, a great collection of paintings by well known European artists, a floor dedicated to religious art from the Cologne area, and for another couple of months, an exhibition of art by American artists. Many of the exhibits have side notes about the artist, and the painting, and available is an audio guide. Cost of admission is 15 euros, money well spent.
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