San Pietro in Mavino

Sirmione, Italy

In 765 AD Cuninomodo, a member of the nobility, was ordered by the King Desiderio and Queen Ansa to donate his property to Sirmione’s basilicas and the Brescian monastery San Salvatore to expiate his guilt for a murder committed in Pavia’s royal palace. This is the period when San Pietro in Mavinas church was build (the name probably comes from the Latin “ad summa vineas” meaning place with the wineyards up high). The Roman bell tower was definited built at a later date, in two phases between the eleventh and twelth centuries, which is a when the frescos decorating the apses were painted. The church San Pietro in Mavino underwent restoration in 1320.

The church has a rectangular plan and is oriented east-west. The cancel contains three apses. The one in the middle shows a Christ Pantocrator in Byzantine tradition; the one on the left a Madonna Enthroned; the one on the right a Crucifixion. The ceiling is made of wooden beams. The church contains frescoes from the 12th-16th centuries. The Romanesque bell tower dates from 1070. The church has been used in the past as a military hospital and its surroundings as a cemetery for plague victims.

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Details

Founded: 1320
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.sirmionehotel.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bennie Mostro del Lago di Garda (2 years ago)
Beautiful little church on the little island Sirmione. Did you know there is a legend monster in lake Garda? visit Bthemonster.com
Alessandro Borgonovo - IZ2OAV (2 years ago)
Véry nice and silence.
Arkadiusz Jenczak (2 years ago)
Very nice and quiet place. Not many people visit the place. Church was renowated in 2019, so the frescos and altars looks like new.
Shannon Wentworth (2 years ago)
Beautiful church and tranquil park. A wonderful place to rest on a warm summer day.
Damselfly (2 years ago)
Just beautiful. Atmospheric. Old history. Faded frescoes adorn the walls! A*
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