San Pietro in Mavino

Sirmione, Italy

In 765 AD Cuninomodo, a member of the nobility, was ordered by the King Desiderio and Queen Ansa to donate his property to Sirmione’s basilicas and the Brescian monastery San Salvatore to expiate his guilt for a murder committed in Pavia’s royal palace. This is the period when San Pietro in Mavinas church was build (the name probably comes from the Latin “ad summa vineas” meaning place with the wineyards up high). The Roman bell tower was definited built at a later date, in two phases between the eleventh and twelth centuries, which is a when the frescos decorating the apses were painted. The church San Pietro in Mavino underwent restoration in 1320.

The church has a rectangular plan and is oriented east-west. The cancel contains three apses. The one in the middle shows a Christ Pantocrator in Byzantine tradition; the one on the left a Madonna Enthroned; the one on the right a Crucifixion. The ceiling is made of wooden beams. The church contains frescoes from the 12th-16th centuries. The Romanesque bell tower dates from 1070. The church has been used in the past as a military hospital and its surroundings as a cemetery for plague victims.

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Details

Founded: 1320
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.sirmionehotel.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pancasatya Agastra (2 years ago)
The church with a bell and a modern cannon in the front yard.
Paul Wheeldon (2 years ago)
Nice little very old church, looks like nothing has change from the day it was built.
G. D. (3 years ago)
Nice place, the view is worth a 20 minutes walk from the city. Almost no one gets there because the approach is pretty steep. The church looks amazing
Thomas Ozbun (3 years ago)
Located on the highest point of the peninsula, it is the oldest church in Sirmione. The bell tower dates to the 11th century while the frescoes inside, which are really nice, from the 12th and 13th centuries
paul appleby (3 years ago)
A lovely setting & fabulous old church simple decoration on the interior & wonderful stained glass. The poignant War Memorial is to the left of the church. Away from the crowds but only 800m from the centre & 200m from the Villa Catullo. Well worth a visit if in the area.
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