Ardvreck Castle Ruins

Highland, United Kingdom

Ardvreck Castle is thought to have been constructed around 1590 by the Clan MacLeod family who owned Assynt and the surrounding area from the 13th century onwards. Clan MacKenzie attacked and captured Ardvreck Castle in 1672, and then took control of the Assynt lands. In 1726 they constructed a more modern manor house nearby, Calda House, which takes its name from the Calda burn beside which it stands. A fire destroyed the house under mysterious circumstances one night in 1737 and both Calda House and Ardvreck Castle stand as ruins today.

Ardvreck Castle was a rectangular-shaped keep comprising three storeys. Under the castle the vaulted basement is pierced by gunloops and the round stair turret is corbelled out to support a square caphouse. Despite the small size of the ruined tower, Ardvreck was originally a large and imposing structure and it is thought that the castle included a walled garden and formal courtyard. The remains of the foundations can still be seen and cover a large area. Unfortunately, all that remains today is a tower and part of a defensive wall. When the waters of the loch rise very high, the peninsula on which the castle stands can be cut off from the mainland.

The castle is said to be haunted by two ghosts, one a tall man dressed in grey who is supposed to be related to the betrayal of Montrose and may even be Montrose himself. The second ghost is that of a young girl. The story tells that the MacLeods procured the help of Clootie (a Scottish name for the Devil, deriving from 'cloot', meaning one division of a cleft hoof) to build the castle and in return the daughter of one of the MacLeod chieftains was betrothed to him as payment. In despair of her situation, the girl threw herself from one of the towers and was killed.

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Founded: 1590
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Danny Rasidin (2 years ago)
A place full of history. If you're interested into the stories of the scottish clans, than this is the place to visit.
Lisa Junor (2 years ago)
Stunning castle to visit with a beautiful surrounding Loch.
Aleksandra Radzikowska (2 years ago)
It's not really a castle anymore, barely a ruin but in great picturesque location. With nearby Gala House one can take a walk and enjoy the stunning views over loch Assynt and towards Quinag. Loads of photo opportunities as well.
Emily (2 years ago)
What a beautiful area of the world this part of Scotland is! Ardvreck Castle ruins isnt much to look at and explore but it's location is everything. Sitting next to Loch Assynt with hills surrounding it. When we visited there were stags watching us from the hills and we took a swim in the loch. Amazing. Unfortunately not much parking and access is tricky, it's a walk from the road.
Adam8965 (3 years ago)
Interesting castle, strange location right at the bottom of step hill and mountains.... Well worth a visit if your in the area.
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